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Thread: Niten Ichi Ryu/Ryoto-jutsu

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    Question Niten Ichi Ryu/Ryoto-jutsu

    I know that Niten Ichi Ryu comprises of two sword techniques just like Ryoto-jutsu. Ryoto-Jutsu is part of the Katori Shinto Ryu curriculum. Does anyone know what the differences are between the two?

    Chris Oldknow

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenjutsuaddict
    I know that Niten Ichi Ryu comprises of two sword techniques just like Ryoto-jutsu. Ryoto-Jutsu is part of the Katori Shinto Ryu curriculum. Does anyone know what the differences are between the two?

    Chris Oldknow
    I think Hyaku-Sensei practics NIR, and he should be able to answer your question, but just in case:

    www.hyoho.com

    Peace.

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    They're different schools..Use the swords differently..And teach different methodologies..Kinda like asking what the difference is between Africa and Europe since they both have Humans on them...Not much...But a lot.
    Read more perhaps on this subject..
    Regards.
    Ben
    Ben Sharples.
    智は知恵、仁は思いやり、勇は勇気と説いています。

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenjutsuaddict
    I know that Niten Ichi Ryu comprises of two sword techniques just like Ryoto-jutsu. Ryoto-Jutsu is part of the Katori Shinto Ryu curriculum. Does anyone know what the differences are between the two?
    Niten Ichi Ryu has both one- and two-sword techniques, as does Katori Shinto Ryu (and others). One school's ryoto/nitto will differ from another's just as much as their itto will, so trying to state the differences would be beyond the scope of an online forum.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    I think (and this is only my theory) that Niten Ichi Ryu has more emphasis on the ryoto than does Katori Shinto Ryu.

    In TSKSR we have 4 kata with Ryoto. This is taught, as well as the kodachi and long weapons, to complement the kenjutsu. As such, it is a smaller part of the school.

    From what I have seen, NIR has more emphasis on the two sword techniques - and that's what they are famous for, right? ;-)

    Brian, any comments?

    Technically I have no experience with NIR ryoto.
    Yours friendly,

    K. Sandven


    Blog: My Life In Budo

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    Quote Originally Posted by kongoshin
    ...Brian, any comments?
    Nope.

    Since I have practiced neither art I can't speak of them with any foundation. Yours does seem to be a logical assumption, however.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Quote Originally Posted by kongoshin
    From what I have seen, NIR has more emphasis on the two sword techniques - and that's what they are famous for, right? ;-)

    Brian, any comments?

    Technically I have no experience with NIR ryoto.
    I think Hyaku has said it until he's been blue in the face, HNIR is a one sword school that coincidentally teaches double sword technique. The actual name of the ryuha doesn't refer to the techniques of the ryuha, but has a deeper, religious meaning altogether.

    Hopefully Mr. Hyakutake will chime in and clarify.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Delaney
    I think Hyaku has said it until he's been blue in the face, HNIR is a one sword school that coincidentally teaches double sword technique. The actual name of the ryuha doesn't refer to the techniques of the ryuha, but has a deeper, religious meaning altogether.

    Hopefully Mr. Hyakutake will chime in and clarify.
    The start of this thread was a question concerning the techniques. The names and philosophies of the styles are food for lots of other threads;-)

    Well - this means that HNIR and TSKSR have the same approach in this matter, both being mainly one-sword schools. But, at least in TSKSR, they teach other weapons/variations to expand on their abilities to meet any opponent. In TSKSR the uke part is always the sword, whilst the kirikomi weilds the other weapons. One also learns the kirikomi side of the kata before learning how to block them.

    Especially ryoto can be vary hard to block, so an understanding of these techniques are neccessary to be able to block them.

    I find Ryoto is a lot of fun, by the way :-D
    Yours friendly,

    K. Sandven


    Blog: My Life In Budo

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    Quote Originally Posted by kongoshin
    I think (and this is only my theory) that Niten Ichi Ryu has more emphasis on the ryoto than does Katori Shinto Ryu.

    In TSKSR we have 4 kata with Ryoto. This is taught, as well as the kodachi and long weapons, to complement the kenjutsu. As such, it is a smaller part of the school.

    From what I have seen, NIR has more emphasis on the two sword techniques - and that's what they are famous for, right? ;-)

    Brian, any comments?

    Technically I have no experience with NIR ryoto.
    Based on my understanding of things, HNIR has 5 main two sword kata, and 10 additional ones in two sets of 5 that were added later and are no longer taught. HNIR does not emphasize two sword techniques.
    Nulli Secundus

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