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Thread: One style over another?

  1. #46
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    [QUOTE=Katsu!]

    My school is closely allied with an Isshin Ryu school here in Sydney. My Sensei is training in Kobudo and has taught me some Bo, Sai and Kama kata.
    We also visit each others Dojo for Shodan gradings for sparring.



    Sydney? Are you in Australia?

    If so I beleive I have communicated with some of the people there in IR. I also believe that it is Ryu Kyu Kobudo Tesshin kan that they are studying under Tamasoe Sensei..... we may have more in common that we think hahahahah ....... I beleive that many of the IR people there also study IR under AJ Advincula sensei.

    Both teach That understanding and training is what it is all about.

    Mike O'Leary
    Old Dragon

  2. #47
    Bustillo, A. Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Katsu!
    "By understanding What we dont do helped me understand what we do." i couldn't agree more!
    I have always had questions regarding grappling and throwdowns so after i reached Shodan in Goju i decided to train also in Japanese Ju Jitsu to figure out how the two differed.
    M.Miletic.

    Militec katsu originally wrote to M. Ellis.
    Look to the Kata for ideas on dealing with other styles of fighting since as you know Go Ju is meant for close contact. Aas you know low kicks, elbows, grappling and throwdowns are all within the kata so cross training is not a neccesity. ... pick the ones that Go Ju has to offset them. all the coversation has been that Margaret (Ellis) should do this and that to prepare herself for full contact implying that Go Ju is lacking and flawed.

    .

    You contradict the suggestions you gave M. Ellis.
    I still find it hard to believe why anyone would give such advice.

    Most have agreed, to be well-rounded, after you have a foundation in one system, exploring other styles is essential.
    Last edited by Bustillo, A.; 20th December 2005 at 13:57.

  3. #48
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    Default All styles are good, there are only bad instructors

    I have been taught that basically, at the end of the day, all (properly accredited and traditional) styles are equal, but that the differences lie with the quality of the instructors.

    I study Isshinryu, and have always been taught to respect other styles and have an open mind. I do "prefer" my style and it suits my size and build well (5' 6'') and allows me to move more naturally. I have studied Goju and find it to be excellent as well.

    I admit that I am biased against "non traditional" schools like the "extreme" stuff floating around out there, with the crome plated, feather light bo's, and yes, Tae Kwan Do, only for the reason that it is so "commercial" and "sport" oriented. There are good traditional TKD schools out there, but they are few amd far in between.

  4. #49
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    Smile I couldn't agree more!

    Quote Originally Posted by Nadelman
    I have been taught that basically, at the end of the day, all (properly accredited and traditional) styles are equal, but that the differences lie with the quality of the instructors.

    I study Isshinryu, and have always been taught to respect other styles and have an open mind. I do "prefer" my style and it suits my size and build well (5' 6'') and allows me to move more naturally. I have studied Goju and find it to be excellent as well.

    I admit that I am biased against "non traditional" schools like the "extreme" stuff floating around out there, with the crome plated, feather light bo's, and yes, Tae Kwan Do, only for the reason that it is so "commercial" and "sport" oriented. There are good traditional TKD schools out there, but they are few amd far in between.
    I am also a small person and to me Goju ryu is perfect for someone of my stature. I think they same about Tae Kwan Do and that is why I moved on from that style. I would have said the same thing about that style as you did but I felt it would have been stating the obvious. But then again, it is a Koren art and it is really unfair to judge the "sell out" additude they have, when Japanese treditional stylist have a completely different mind set.
    As far as the flashy weapons........they make me sick. I think the worst Iv'e seen is eithier the glow in the dark kamas or the bos that have flashing lights embedded in them. Then again, I can't forget the pink nunchucku or the foam katana. It can only go down from here.
    With much respect,
    -Margeaux Ellis
    Karate is a matter of the heart. -Miyagi Chojun Sensei

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bustillo, A.
    You contradict the suggestions you gave M. Ellis.
    I still find it hard to believe why anyone would give such advice.

    Most have agreed, to be well-rounded, after you have a foundation in one system, exploring other styles is essential.
    What I still don't get Mr. Bustillo, is how do some people think that the elbows and knees, etc. in karate-do kata compare to a style/art that actually uses them in pad work/drills/sparring on a regular basis?

    So...when you fought in the Sabaki Challenge did you train in nothing but kata to prepare for the leg kicks, knee strikes, etc.?

    I know I trained in nothing but Unsu and Chinto to prepare for the Sabaki Sattellite Screw rounds of thai pads, bag work, and sparring...all kata, baby!
    Brian Culpepper

  6. #51
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    Default my take

    Being in the military, I moved around quite a bit and didn't get to stay with one particular school for any great length of time. Now, I am in college and trying to continue my training as best I can. Currently, I train at a TKD school here in Austin. I would prefer a Japanese style, but well, money is tight and I don't have to pay for classes since I help out at the school.

    However...

    At my last belt test, my instructor invited a fighter in to help out with the sparring. On top of his long list of training, he has apparently spent the past few years training in Muay Thai. I had my lunch handed to me. I would like to pretend that 12 years of working out (and I do train harder than most) helped me in some fashion, but being critical, I felt that much of what I thought I knew didn't really help out when it came down to contact. My only real defense was to take him to the ground and that didn't come from TKD.

    He now trains me 4 times a week for 3 hours a day and I love every minute of it.

    I would love to stay in one traditional style and move through the ranks. I become frustrated with my training when I begin to see that the techniques I am "learning" aren't effective or we don't get the opportunity to work with them. Nothing is more frustrating to me to go to a school that teaches all these great techniques, but then does not give the students a chance to work.

    And I mean absolutely no offense to risingsun by saying this, but I would suggest actually fighting a MT fighter under friendly terms before you enter a real match against one. I was a MP in the Marines who used to duke it out with grunts all the time and the guy that is training me now put tears in my eyes when he started working on my arms and legs.
    ERIC DANIEL WARD

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