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View Poll Results: Nuchaku came from..??

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  • Okinawa

    18 64.29%
  • Japan

    0 0%
  • China

    10 35.71%
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Thread: The Origin of Nunchaku

  1. #1
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    Default The Origin of Nunchaku

    Some says CHINA, Others says OKINAWA, while some says Japan ! So what's the answer ?
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    I once read (I forget where) that there is an Indian sandstone carving (In Delhi or somewhere like that) showing "nunchaku" (rice flail) being used in defence. Perhaps it was an Indian tool?

    On a side note, I have seen some rather good pics in a national Geographic of the early Egyptions using tonfa (tuifa) in single man combat along with what appears to be sai.
    David Kemlo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hattori
    I once read (I forget where) that there is an Indian sandstone carving (In Delhi or somewhere like that) showing "nunchaku" (rice flail) being used in defence. Perhaps it was an Indian tool?

    On a side note, I have seen some rather good pics in a national Geographic of the early Egyptions using tonfa (tuifa) in single man combat along with what appears to be sai.

    Do you remember the year ? My dad collected these magazine for the last 10 years, maybe I could look for it.
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    I'll see if I still have it.
    David Kemlo

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    I'll say it was part of a horse bridle and could be found in all of the countries. As to who was the first to swing it at an opponent, I won't venture a guess.
    Respectfully
    Mark W. Swarthout, Shodan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hattori
    I'll see if I still have it.

    Thanks ! I really appreciate this Mr. Kemlo
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackwood
    As to who was the first to swing it at an opponent, I won't venture a guess.
    This is part of the question the killing my brain cell Somehwere down in history someone must have thought.....Hmmmm
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    You know, parallel development is entirely possible.

    Medieval European peasant soldiers used (long) flails in combat too.
    Cheers,

    Mike
    No-Kan-Do

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeWilliams
    You know, parallel development is entirely possible.

    Medieval European peasant soldiers used (long) flails in combat too.
    if That's true, How did the Okinawan get all the credit ?
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    I'll keep digging for that National Geographic, but it may have been thrown out. Sorry.
    David Kemlo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hattori
    I'll keep digging for that National Geographic, but it may have been thrown out. Sorry.

    That's cool Mr. Kemplo, Maybe I'll visit my folks tomorrows and spend some time reading. Do you remember the cover ?
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    I really want to thank those that posted on the Poll. So far we have Okinawa as the sourced of Nunchaku. Can any of the pollster post as to where the source came from ? Thanks ! I think this makes a great historical thread.
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    As mentioned above, I always thought a simple weapon in the shape of a nunchaku could have appeared in differet cultures in different times and independently from one another.

    Anyway, does nunchaku appear in any originally mainland Japanese martial art?
    Sidarta de Lucca

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    Medieval Hungarian [the Taborite] soldiers used a kind of threshing flail similar to the Korean and Okinawan/Japanese one- it had a long shaft [about 5 feet] and a short nunchaku sized one on the end. The nunchaku on the other hand is a weapon derived from an agricultural tool, in this case a horsehair bit and bridle. The sai would seem to be in a similar situation. They are based on something, opinions differ as to what, however they are not themselves tools but weapons. A bo on the other hand is a stick/tool used as a weapon. The thing to remember about European medieval weapons is that their methods of use were generally forgotten after they were superseded by effective firearms. For a while, as firearms were still time consuming to reload, they co-existed with the older weapons. The Taborites were renowned not only for their close in fighting ferocity but their wagon laagers which were defended by well organised teams of hand gunners. In Japan and Okinawa this was not the case [the ruling class in Japan actually legislating to ensure the survival of classical weaponry by ruling that no new firearms were introduced- all the late sengoku jidai battles featured arquebusiers prominently; they were the single most effective weapons on the battlefield- they had the same distaste as the medieval knight for a weapon which gave poorly armoured and armed peasants a fighting chance. There was a Papal edict outlawing the use of the crossbow against fellow Christians, due no doubt to pressure from outraged aristocracy, since it gave the plebians an armour piercing chance against the knightly class! ]. No doubt there was some cross fertilisation between traders learning tech and teaching them on their return home. The classic modern example of that is Bruce Lee [Chinese] being taught nunchaku by a Dan Inosanto [Filipino] who had learned an Okinawan derived art [kempo].
    Lurking in dark alleys may be hazardous to other peoples health........

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jock Armstrong
    Medieval Hungarian [the Taborite] soldiers used a kind of threshing flail similar to the Korean and Okinawan/Japanese one- it had a long shaft [about 5 feet] and a short nunchaku sized one on the end. The nunchaku on the other hand is a weapon derived from an agricultural tool, in this case a horsehair bit and bridle. The sai would seem to be in a similar situation. They are based on something, opinions differ as to what, however they are not themselves tools but weapons. A bo on the other hand is a stick/tool used as a weapon. The thing to remember about European medieval weapons is that their methods of use were generally forgotten after they were superseded by effective firearms. For a while, as firearms were still time consuming to reload, they co-existed with the older weapons. The Taborites were renowned not only for their close in fighting ferocity but their wagon laagers which were defended by well organised teams of hand gunners. In Japan and Okinawa this was not the case [the ruling class in Japan actually legislating to ensure the survival of classical weaponry by ruling that no new firearms were introduced- all the late sengoku jidai battles featured arquebusiers prominently; they were the single most effective weapons on the battlefield- they had the same distaste as the medieval knight for a weapon which gave poorly armoured and armed peasants a fighting chance. There was a Papal edict outlawing the use of the crossbow against fellow Christians, due no doubt to pressure from outraged aristocracy, since it gave the plebians an armour piercing chance against the knightly class! ]. No doubt there was some cross fertilisation between traders learning tech and teaching them on their return home. The classic modern example of that is Bruce Lee [Chinese] being taught nunchaku by a Dan Inosanto [Filipino] who had learned an Okinawan derived art [kempo].

    Interesting historical input Mr. Armstrong ! Somehow I could not find any weapons on the net. if any happens to come across one please post.
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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