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Thread: Is Aikido ever used in the UFC?

  1. #16
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    I think it'd be pretty fn cool to wristlock someone and smash their face into a cage for the victory.
    Walt Janeski

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeWilliams
    Why those exceptions? Why is competing in boxing OK, but not MMA?
    edit* I think you may misunderstand, I meant it's more acceptable for a boxer, Thai boxer, or a Sumo to compete in MMA than it is for a aikidoka to compete in MMA.

    It's more acceptable for a boxer, Thai boxer, or a Sumo to compete in MMA than it is for a aikidoka to compete in MMA because they have roots in entertainment:

    Sumo HEIAN PERIOD (794-1185)

    Throughout history, Sumo has been an extremely popular form of entertainment, ecpecially at the Imperial Court. The earliest known bout performed for an Imperial presence took place for Empress Kogyoku, who reigned from 642-645. It was reportedly for the envoys from Paekche Court of Korea, who were visiting at the time.

    However, the Heian period was a period in which Sumo was immensly popular among both the noble classes and the common people. The most well-known events during this period were the performances at the Imperial Court.

    Under the rule of Emporer Shomu (724-749), in the early 8th century, the practice of holding regular tournaments was developed. Emporer Shomu held lavish tournaments, for which officials were responsible for travelling all around, to even the most remote provinces of Japan, in order to recruit the best possible sumbobaito (wrestlers) to perform. The sumobaito were ordered back to the capital, where they took part in the festival called Sechie, which took place in the Imperial garden on the seventh month each year.

    Not only did the lavish tournaments include sumo matches, but cultural entertainments, such as poetry reading, also took place. The purpose of these elaborate festivals was primarily a religious one, with the aim being to pray for the nations prosperity. This period marked the first time that large-scale tournaments such as these had ever been held.
    http://journals.iranscience.net:800/...ite/heian.html

    Western Boxing, at least as we know it, has roots in gladiator fights. Some forms came from Egypt and such out of war, but right now most trace their lineage to gladiators in Rome.

    As for Muay Thai
    Traditionally in the past, Muay Thai was used as entertainment to kings. It is thought by some sources that gloves were made out of wrapped twine, tar, and broken pieces of glass to ensure a bloody event, however it is still a subject of debate.


    Nai Khanomtom
    A very famous fighter was Nai Khanomtom. Around 1774, he was captured along with other Thai prisoners, either in a skirmish or at the fall of the ancient capital of Siam (Thailand's name at that time) of Ayutthaya. He was brought to Rangoon in Burma, where the Burmese king Mangra was holding a religious festival in honor of Buddha's relics. The festivities included many forms of entertainment. King Mangra was reported to be curious to see how the various fighting styles of Burma and other countries would compare. At one point, he wanted to see how Muay Thai (or Muay Boran) would compare to the Burmese art (either Parma (?) or Lethwei (?)). Nai Khanomtom was selected to fight against the Burmese champion. Nai Khanomtom did a Wai Kru (wai khru ram muay) pre-fight dance which puzzled all of the Burmese. When the fight began, he charged out and using punches, kicks, elbows, and knees, quickly pummelled the Burmese.

    The referee was reported to have stated that the Burmese opponent was distracted by the Wai Kru, so the knockout was invalid. The King then asked if Nai Khanomtom would fight nine other Burmese champions to prove himself. He agreed and fought them all, one after the other. The last Burmese was reputed to be a great boxing teacher. Nai Khanomtom defeated them all in a superior fashion. King Mangra was so impressed that he remarked, "Every part of the Thai is blessed with venom. Even with his bare hands, he can fell nine or ten opponents. As his lord master was incompetent, the country was lost to the enemy. If his lord were any good, there was no way the City of Ayutthaya would fall." He granted Nai Khanomtom the promised freedom along with either riches or two beautiful Burmese wives. Nai Khanomtom chose the wives as he said that money was easier to find. He then departed with his wives for Siam (Thailand). Other variations of this story had him also winning the release of his fellow Thai prisoners. His feat is celebrated every March 17 as "Boxer's Day" or "National Muay Thai Day" in his honor and that of Muay Thai's.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muay_Thai#History
    Last edited by Lowriderx52; 9th May 2006 at 04:37.
    e-budo is anti-budo

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkThrone
    I train both in Daito Ryu (Renshinkan school), and MMA. Aiki principle can be applied to MMA techniques. Wrist locks might be hard to apply as a submission, but they are great as transition techniques. The problem as I see it (and this is my own humble opinion), above and beyond the philosophical issues, is that most aikido schools do not train with "aliveness" or resistance. My daito ryu sensei emphasizes both in our daito ryu training. That is one thing that makes training in MMA such a valuable addition to a TMA. MMA, by its very nature, trains with aliveness and resistance. Judo, BJJ, Muay Thai, etc, practice their techniques at full speed with resisting opponents.
    You are only speaking at the phsycial level of aikido (though in Daito Ryu "aiki" may be defined differently? I don't know)

    To me, to follow aikido, fighting when it was not the last resort is a mental and emotional failure in aiki, so how can setting up fights for money be aiki?
    e-budo is anti-budo

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkThrone
    Wrist locks might be hard to apply as a submission, but they are great as transition techniques. The problem as I see it (and this is my own humble opinion), above and beyond the philosophical issues, is that most aikido schools do not train with "aliveness" or resistance.
    Exactly.

    To use an MMA.TV-ism, you have just kote-gaeshi'd the correct!
    Cheers,

    Mike
    No-Kan-Do

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowriderx52
    You are only speaking at the phsycial level of aikido (though in Daito Ryu "aiki" may be defined differently? I don't know)

    To me, to follow aikido, fighting when it was not the last resort is a mental and emotional failure in aiki, so how can setting up fights for money be aiki?
    Yes, I was speaking of the physical principle of aiki, such as aiki age/aiki sage, kazushi, ma-ai, etc. The "physics" of aiki if you will. I have never been in an altercation, but that does not prevent me from training as realistically as possible to be prepared in case the situation arises. Philosophical differences not withstanding, there should be no reason not to be able to use your aikido in a violent confrontation.
    Kelley Carter
    Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu Renshinkan

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