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Thread: Mythbusters - Sword Myth

  1. #16
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    Look at the number of times that they touch the blade and they don't get cut.....Makes me wonder how sharp the blades actually are.
    People not familiar with Japanese swords are often surprised by this. You can actually take a blade that is VERY sharp and pat it with your hand, as long as there is no lateral movement relative to the blade (I don't recommend trying it...just noting that it is not unusual). Even a very little bit of lateral movement...and you will be cut.

    Best,
    Ron

  2. #17
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    This episode is being shown right now! 9 EST Sunday night
    Respectfully
    Mark W. Swarthout, Shodan

  3. #18
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    OK, someone that understands metalurgy a lot better than me tell me if this would be a good steel to make a katana from and why or why not. It looks as if it would be a MF of a blade....

    AerMet 100 Tool Steel

    I came across this when researching the steel that is used by Morgan Valley Forge for their "Super Katana" offering.
    Harvey Moul

    Fish and visitors stink after three days - Ben Franklin

  4. #19
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    I have conections, if you will, with the folks at a company called angel swords, if youve heard of them, and they sent in a sword for the mythbusters thing, and they wrote back after the filming and said there sword preformed magnificently and came out unharmed. Now because there were only two katanas that came out of the testing, do you know which sword was not the AS, cause the folks at as cant figure out which swor dit is, and were starting to think it didnt show, but if you knwo the maker or one of the other swords maybe you can tell me which one so i can tell the AS guys which one is theres, not trying to advertise.

    Thanks
    William J. Toohey

    We mortals are but shadows and dust, but they who are legend never perish.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duanew
    Look at the number of times that they touch the blade and they don't get cut.....Makes me wonder how sharp the blades actually are. ...
    As an experiment, get a good, sharp, fine-edged knife like a JA Henkels or a Wustof Trident chef's knife. Then get a nice roast or thick steak (raw, but not frozen).

    Press the edge of the knife down onto the meat without pushing or pulling it. You'll be able to press pretty firmly and deeply without cutting into the meat.

    Now, draw the knife across the meat. It doesn't take much downward force to cut deeply into the meat when the blade is drawn across it.

    It's the same with the sword. It's not an axe that we hack with. A proper cut is executed so that at the point of contact, the "sweet spot" of the edge is slicing -- not chopping -- the target. In many techniques the edge is "pulled" across the target, but there are some where it is "pushed" as well.

    HTH.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  6. #21
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    OK, someone that understands metalurgy a lot better than me tell me if this would be a good steel to make a katana from and why or why not.
    Hey Harvey,
    The "why not" is totally contained in the following sentence ...
    It can be heat treated to a hardness of 53.5-55.0 Rc, ...
    That is not sufficiently hard enough for Japanese swords, which are typically in the low to mid 60s in Rockwell hardness along the cutting edge. The back of the sword is typically in the mid 40s. This is where the Japanese sword's distinctive hamon comes from, the difference in steel hardness that is made visible through polishing.

    Mid 50s is the range that European swords are typically hardened to. They do not hold their edge like Japanese swords, but they are much more flexible, and so do not take a set as a Japanese sword would.
    Paul Smith
    "Always keep the sharp side and the pointy end between you and your opponent"

  7. #22
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    I just knew there had to be a reason why such a wonderful steel wasn't being exploited by sword fanatics....
    Harvey Moul

    Fish and visitors stink after three days - Ben Franklin

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens
    As an experiment, get a good, sharp, fine-edged knife like a JA Henkels or a Wustof Trident chef's knife. Then get a nice roast or thick steak (raw, but not frozen).
    HTH.

    Been there, done that.
    I am on my third Zwillings/Henkels 10" chef's knife.
    Snapped the first two trying to cut frozen beef. Lol!

    Thank heavens it has a lifetime guarantee!
    Ray Baldonade
    Chibana-ha Shorin-ryu

    "Love many, trust few and do wrong to none". Chan Yau-man

  9. #24
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    I prefer the Wustof santoku chef knife - 8 or 10 inch model. My wife and I actually put away the classic chef knife and replaced it in the block with the santoku one because we used it so often.
    Harvey Moul

    Fish and visitors stink after three days - Ben Franklin

  10. #25
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    Default Japanese sword vs. sword

    I once logged in on a similar discussion to repeat what Donn F. Draeger told me regarding tests he did regarding whether or not a sword would bend or break against a jo strike.

    Since then, I met an iaido sensei who told me that he saw a sword reputed to have belonged to Sakamoto Ryoma when he was assasinated, back in the late 1800s. The sword had a sliver sliced off from nearly the sword tip to the handle. He said it should be a national treasure because it showed that Ryoma probably held it in an uke-nagashi deflection position, and it did deflect a sword blow, but the other sword must have been one h--- of a piece of metal because it sliced a strip off another sword.

    Anyway, my two-cents' worth.

    Wayne Muromoto

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmuromoto
    I once logged in on a similar discussion to repeat what Donn F. Draeger told me regarding tests he did regarding whether or not a sword would bend or break against a jo strike.

    Wayne Muromoto
    Mr. Muromoto,

    Where could we see this discussion?
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nyuck3X
    ...I am on my third Zwillings/Henkels 10" chef's knife.
    Snapped the first two trying to cut frozen beef.
    You heathen!

    A chef's knife is for mincing herbs, chopping onions, etc.

    If you want to section frozen meat, you should use a meat cleaver (not a vegetable or Chinese cleaver), or a serrated utility knife -- NOT a chef's knife, carving knife, fillet knife, boning knife, salmon knife...
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens
    You heathen!

    A chef's knife is for mincing herbs, chopping onions, etc.

    If you want to section frozen meat, you should use a meat cleaver (not a vegetable or Chinese cleaver), or a serrated utility knife -- NOT a chef's knife, carving knife, fillet knife, boning knife, salmon knife...
    Jeez, I know!
    It was a wedding gift too!

    It was my favorite knife at the time and I was using it for everything.
    Actually I learned my lesson with the first one, the second time I think
    I dropped it. Talk about high carbon steel!
    Ray Baldonade
    Chibana-ha Shorin-ryu

    "Love many, trust few and do wrong to none". Chan Yau-man

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shitoryu Dude
    I prefer the Wustof santoku chef knife...
    I really like the santoku-style knives. I still use my chef's knives for some tasks, but I have both a standard and a granton-edged santoku, and really like them both. They combine the best of a chef's knife and a small cleaver, with a certain feel all their own.

    Similarly I like the kudomodo paring knife for tasks like paring (obviously), as well as slicing and dicing shallots, garlic, and the like. For some folk it is a nice alternative to French-design paring knives.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  15. #30
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    I used a Chinese cleaver for a number of years for mincing and chopping. Unfortunately, the blade lost to a particularly hard chicken bone.
    Respectfully
    Mark W. Swarthout, Shodan

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