Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Advice for a beginner?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    50
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Advice for a beginner?

    This may seem like an overly general question but here goes anyway...

    Next weekend I will be checking out the Genbukan dojo here in Toronto. I have been researching for quite some time and am as sure as one can be about this without actually trying out the training. A couple of days ago I found the phone # of the local dojo cho and we talked for a while and arranged for me to come check it out. I am pretty excited.

    So yeah...any advice for someone who is about to check things out in person for the first time?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    68
    Likes (received)
    2

    Default sure

    Arrive without any preconceived ideas...

    _____________
    j. gautreaux

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    50
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Thank you that is certainly good advice. May I ask what preconceived ideas students typically arrive with in your experience?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baghdad, Iraq
    Posts
    3,084
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Troy Wideman runs the Toronto Genbukan dojo, and is a personal friend. You are VERY LUCKY to be able to attend his classes.
    John Lindsey

    Oderint, dum metuant-Let them hate, so long as they fear.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    50
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Wait...I'm confused.

    I thought Troy Wideman ran the Kitchener dojo. The man I spoke to on the phone was called Larry Mitchell.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sault ste Marie, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    19
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Kyoshi Wideman is the shibu-cho of Canada and runs his dojo out of Kitchener. Larry Mitchell is now running a dojo in Toronto. I was recently able to meet Larry briefly at the Canadian Tai Kai, he is a very nice gentleman and you should enjoy your time with him. I look forward to hearing about the experience you have.
    Sincerly Matthew Damignani

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    206
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vic20
    Thank you that is certainly good advice. May I ask what preconceived ideas students typically arrive with in your experience?
    That would depend on which movies you have seen and which books you have read. Generally speaking, don't believe anything you've seen in any movie, anything you've heard from anyone (unless they've actually been training), and take anything you've read with a truckload of salt. And if you've seen Fight Science on the National Geographic Channel, disregard all of that, too.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    50
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by imarubber
    That would depend on which movies you have seen and which books you have read. Generally speaking, don't believe anything you've seen in any movie, anything you've heard from anyone (unless they've actually been training), and take anything you've read with a truckload of salt. And if you've seen Fight Science on the National Geographic Channel, disregard all of that, too.
    Well as I said I have been researching for quite some time. I learned a long time ago that the hollywood version of things is quite false. Around a year ago I stopped considering all sources of information except that which came from genuine Ninpo practitioners.

    And I have no idea what Fight Science is as I don't watch TV.

    So I guess I do have a lot of preconceived ideas...its just that those ideas have come from actual Ninpo practitioners. But even so I wil try to clear my mind of those ideas until they can be confirmed by my actual experiences.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    50
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mdamignani
    Kyoshi Wideman is the shibu-cho of Canada and runs his dojo out of Kitchener. Larry Mitchell is now running a dojo in Toronto. I was recently able to meet Larry briefly at the Canadian Tai Kai, he is a very nice gentleman and you should enjoy your time with him. I look forward to hearing about the experience you have.
    Sincerly Matthew Damignani
    OK, thanks for the clarification.
    I will update this with my first experiences and impressions once I have seen a class.

    Anyone have any other advice for me? I want to make sure I make the most of my experience.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    North of the South
    Posts
    392
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Keep an open mind, have an open heart and be ready to learn. That's of course the case with anything you begin.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    508
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vic20

    Anyone have any other advice for me? I want to make sure I make the most of my experience.

    Yep, try all available classes in your area and go with the one YOU feel suits you best.
    'Saru mo ki kara ochiru.' is a Japanese kotowaza or proverb. 'Even monkeys fall from trees.' or essentially 'Nobody's perfect'


    Gary Brewer

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    13
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    I have visited a few dojo's in the last few weeks trying to decide what art to take myself. The most important factor to me was a sense of comfort, did I feel comfortable with the instructor, the dojo itself, and my fellow students.

    The second most important factor was what were the expectations of me as a student both now and as I progressed, was I expected to attend competitions, teach classes, etc, etc., or to simply be an attentive and participative student.

    The last criteria I used was what is the training style of the teacher. Were they a teacher that pushed you hard, or encouraged you and let you progress at your own pace.

    These criteria may not suit you and your needs, but I think the idea of comfort with a dojo/instructor is key. When I went to the dojo I finally decided upon it just felt right.

    Hope this helps, and please let us know how your visit goes.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    50
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Well a couple of you asked me to tell you about the visit so here goes...

    I had never been to this location before so I left plenty early to avoid possibly getting lost and being late. That wouldn't be a good first impression. I got there about 30 minutes early and ended up waiting outside in the cold morning air for others to get there to open. Another student showed up before the instructor did and we chatted for a few minutes. Which brings me to the first item that made an impression...

    The Other Students
    This is the first thing that impressed me. The 3 students I met were very friendly, warm, and open to questions. They were eager to share what they knew and obviously got along very well with each other. There was a strong sense of comraderie that I noticed amongst them. All 3 were experienced martial artists with dan grades in other MAs. I don't know exactly which kyu rank they were in the Genbukan but two wore a green belt and one wore a brown belt with a couple fo black stripes on the end. Their advanced experience plus the small class size should help me learn faster although it will probably be difficult for me at first. Of course my learning curve would also be influenced by...

    The Instructor
    I had only positive impressions of Larry Mitchell. He was clearly an experienced teacher and really conducted the class in such a away as to give me a taste of all aspects of their training. He made sure that the material they went over had a bit of ninpo, a bit of the jujutsu, some hanbo, and some sword work. He was open, friendly, clearly passionate about the art and spent a lot of time answering my questions. He made me feel very comfortable to be there. I was only an observer to this class but he made a point of explaining things to me. He would tell the studebts which technique to work on and while they were doing it he would come over and explain it to me sometimes even pulling out books to show me references for. A few of the techniques he even invited me onto the mat for so that I could "feel what it was like". Which leads me to...

    The Training
    I find myself very attracted to the arts themselves. I was once a Hakko Ryu practitioner and a lot of the wrist/arm locks/throws seem to be very similar (although the body movements are very different) and appear to be very effective. At one point they were practicing a technique (sorry don't remember the name) where uke is thrown and arm-locked by use of the hanbo. I was doubting (internally) the effectiveness of the technique and I believed the intructor picked up on this. He invited me onto the mat to "feel it". He asked be to throw a punch which I did and I found myself almost immediately with the hanbo locking my arm and throwing me to the mat. My other arm was pinned under my body, the intrsuctor was sitting on my hip preventing me from moving my legs and the locked arm felt like it was about to break in two different places. The pain was wonderful and all doubts about the technique were immediately gone. Another technique was later applied to me where tori was behind me with the hanbo in front of my chest being pulled into me and then rolled up and into my chest and coming up onto my collar-bone. I thought I was going to die! lol

    The class was only about 75% finished when I told the instructor that if he would accept me as his student I would be back the next week with a black gi and a white belt. He said that would be fine.

    I had done a lot of research into this and was sure that ninpo was the art for me. I had to check out the class first though to really make a decision. I'm glad I went because I was very impressed and can't wait to start my training (this Saturday).

    Thanks for the advice everyone! If you have any more feel free.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    13
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Very glad things worked out for you. Sounds like you found a good fit!
    Steve Dunn
    Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu
    Seiren Dojo, Kageyama Shibu

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •