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Thread: Teaching Ukime

  1. #1
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    Default Teaching Ukime

    I need a little advice here on getting students comfortable being Uki for throws.

    I have a brown belt in a traditional style of Ju Jitsu, which uses a lot of Judo. About two years ago, I moved from my dojo to a new city. I recently was granted permission to start teaching my style of ju jitsu.

    Now, as a student, Ukime came fairly natural and I've been doing it so long, that it's hard for me to figure out the best way to "teach" how to take a throw (Ippon, Ogoshi, Kubi Nage, etc.).

    Other than basic roll outs, are there any suggestions on how to get these guys used to taking a fall? Executing a throw, I've found, is easier than preparing a new student to take a throw (espeically an adult).

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Jim Mahanes
    Louisville
    Jim Mahanes

  2. #2
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    Have students lay down on their backs with arms outstretched above their heads chin tucked to their chest. On your count ich, ni, san, chi, go, to a count of ten, have them slap the mat at a 45 degree angle to their center line.
    Then have them sit up arms out stretched in front of their face.
    On your count have them fall back to the mat and slap at the same 45 degree angle then sit up prepared to go again. Do this on a count of ten.
    Then have them go to a squat position arms outstretched in front of their face.
    Then on your count they roll back to the matt and slap it at a 45 degree angle again on a ten count.
    Then have them stand up on the balls of their feet arms outstretched in front of their face.
    On your count they fall to feet flat continuing the fall body drops straight down to a squat to a roll to the backwards break fall.
    Remembering to relax and let the body roll like a rocking chair not just splat or plop down. The other key point is to keep the chin tucked to the chest through out all the drills instilling in them from the beginning to control the head so it doesn’t bounce off the floor.

    The side break fall can be layered the same way.
    Chris McLean
    Martial Arts student

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    just something minor...but you may want to use "ukemi"...for the spelling, unless there is some other term in your style of jujutsu that I am unware of...

    Best,
    Ron

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    No....Ukemi is what I mean....thanks.

    Jim
    Jim Mahanes

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    Once you've got the basics down as Chris described, there's lots of other drills. You can have a senior assume the turtle, and have the students reach across his back, grab a handful of keikogi and go for the roll. Alternately, the students can back into him and get their legs taken out, going for the back fall. Back breakfalls can also be done from a handstand. You can have someone hold out the ends of the belt and have them go over the belt (similar action to the fall uki takes for ukiotoshi in nage-no-kata). In that case the senior can assist them by grabbing the sleeve. The senior can offer a lapel and let them grab it, kick up towards the ceiling and back down. Someone can "throw the line". You can have a contest diving for distance. Or to make that even more spicy, have a number of volunteers lined up side by side turtled, and dive over them all, grabbing the keikogi on the last guy to snap over and take the fall. I remember doing that as a kid, although we don't do it in my current club.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

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    It's aimed at Aiki practitioners, but Ellis Amdur's Ukemi From The Ground Up video may be of interest:

    http://www.budovideos.com/shop/custo...cat=276&page=9
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  7. #7
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    Thanks so much for everyone's advice...

    Many of the drills you guys speak of we are doing...at least to some extent as I'm still trying to get these guys up to speed (I have an entire class....5 students...that have never taken a break fall of any kind).

    So it sounds like my initial reaction was correct.....repetition, repetition, repetition.

    Haven't checked out the video yet, but I will certainly check into it.

    Again, thanks for everyone's help....this is a great resource.

    Much respect,

    Jim
    Jim Mahanes

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    Using it as a regular daily part of warming up helps get the desired repetitions for skill development.
    Chris McLean
    Martial Arts student

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    When I started, we did ukemi for 3 months before ever taking a throw. Now I hear of some clubs where they don't teach it at all, due to some inane idea that taking a fall properly will increase your chance of losing a point in a match.

    My current club drills ukemi every class as Chris suggests.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by gendzwil
    Now I hear of some clubs where they don't teach it at all, due to some inane idea that taking a fall properly will increase your chance of losing a point in a match.
    If that's true, than I really feel for the poor students. That sucks. The single most valuable thing you can take away from Judo (or any other throwing art) is the ability to take a fall correctly.

    However - if a judo club teaches turning out of a throw alosngside traditional breakfalls, I don't really have a problem with it*. It's just another form of ukemi.

    (*it's now an essential part of the sport, although less than ideal from a martial/combative perspective)
    Cheers,

    Mike
    No-Kan-Do

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