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Thread: Daito-Ryu Curriculum Structure

  1. #1
    Stephen_Bannan Guest

    Default Aiki Jujitsu[Daito Ryu] Syllabus????

    Just wondering if there is a syllabus written on-line somewhere for Aiki jujitsu/Daito Ryu? I can't go and see any where I live as there isn't any and am just curious about it. I study Yoshinkan Aikido and I've been told that Yoshinkan is as close as you get to aiki jujitsu/Daito Ryu without actually doing it.

    Just wanting to find out what's different between the to schools. If anyone can point me in the direction of a document I will thank them very much.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    chris davis 200 Guest

    Default

    here is some of the syllabus

    Shoden ---------Hidden Mokuroku------- 118 Techniques.
    Aiki-no-jutsu ----------------------------- 53 Techniques.
    Hiden okgui------------------------------- 38 Techniques.
    Goshinyo-no-te--------------------------- 84 Techniques.

    add to that various weaponry techniques, other unarmed methods etc - ya have yourself a large syllabus!


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    Default Re: Aiki Jujitsu[Daito Ryu] Syllabus????

    Originally posted by Stephen_Bannan
    Just wondering if there is a syllabus written on-line somewhere for Aiki jujitsu/Daito Ryu?
    Not sure about online. You can get the IKKAJO syllabus if you have access to Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Hiden Mokuroku: Ikkajo
    by Kondo (http://63.90.120.212/catalog/product...bc1260d5c7f145), it's listed in the TOC (and demonstrated in the rest of the book.) The NIKAJO is on a DVD sold by Julio Toribio.

    If you do a search on the Aikido Journal site, you might find some of the IKKAJO/NIKAJO techniques listed. I think someone asked the same question a year or two ago and someone else uploaded the names for IKKAJO. NIKAJO might be there, too. I think Kondo made some sort of request of Expo attendees last year involving the list.

    Good luck.

    Btw, you might find the names a little deceptive. They're used differently in DR than in other arts. Aikido's NIKYO, e.g., is called variously KOTEZUME, SHUTOZUME, GYAKUUDEDORI, DAKIJIME.
    Don J. Modesto
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    ------------------------
    http://theaikidodojo.com/

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    Default

    If you can read Japanese you can find the 118 Hiden Mokuroku at http://member.nifty.ne.jp/daito-ryu/gihou.html
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

  5. #5
    Stephen_Bannan Guest

    Default

    Well, being as dense as a hessian bag full of spanners I am unable to read Japanese. Thanks anyway.

    I think I'll just say, that there may be similarities 'tween Yoshinkan and Daito-ryu but that's all I know.

    Thanks again.

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    Default Daito-Ryu Curriculum Structure

    Hi Guys~

    quick question

    can anyone describe the general structure and progression of daito-ryu curriculum

    my initial question is this:

    in Aikido ikkajo - gokajo and single specific tehcniques (applied to various situations, but a sankajo wrist twist is still a sankajo throughout)

    in daito-ryu (speficically the hiden mokuroku hyaku ju hakkajo) does ikkajo, nikajo, sankajo etc refer to the same thing (eg all ikkajo techniques are for lack of better word straight elbow lock just applied in various attacks) OR is it like Groupings - Ikkajo group etc (ala Judo's dai ikkyo - dai gokyo) OR ???

    hope u can understand what i mean.

    thanks in advance

    i guess in short .. for daito ryu what does "ikkajo" mean?
    Last edited by Nyumonsha; 20th April 2007 at 10:47.
    Xichen
    Australasian Martial Arts & Self Defence Forums - http://www.ozmaforums.com

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    Found the answer after all the ikkajo part of my question :-)

    Seems they are groupings of techniques/teachings and not singular technique like aikido

    thanks
    Xichen
    Australasian Martial Arts & Self Defence Forums - http://www.ozmaforums.com

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    Default principles

    Never having been taught Daito Ryu please feel free to disregard my every word, but I always thought they referred to principles:

    ie: Ikkajo - control the centre using the shoulder
    Nikkajo - control the centre using the (little finger edge of the) wrist
    Sankajo - control the centre using the palm-suppinated corkscrew effect

    So in other words, taking Nikkajo as an example, Nikkajo is Nikkajo any time you gooseneck the wrist. Whether you do this in a wristlock defence against a wrist grab or a control against a collar grab or against a thrust or whatever.

    First principle - control the shoulder
    Second principle - control the wrist
    Third principle - control the palm
    Fourth Principle - control the forearm
    Simon Keegan 4th Dan
    www.bushinkai.org.uk

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    This is very wrong

    The curriculum is divided first in major groupings of techniques, divided in "mokurokus", the first two, for instance are the "hiden" and the "aikinojutsu".

    The hiden mokuroku, since it is the part of the curriculum 90% of the people will practice for all their lives, was divided in 5 series of 30 techniques each the first three (ikkajo, nikkajo, sankajo) and a different division the remaining two (yonkajo, gokajo), that include also weapons.

    There is by no means a single "common" theme in the techniques of each group, there are very many completely different techniques both in attack and defense in each single series.

    It is actually the opposite way around; since Ueshiba Sensei liked a technique called "ippondori" from ikkajo among the different 30 that there are inside, he decided to extrapolate it and call it "ikkyo" since it came from "ikkajo". The same for nikkyo, sankyo, yonkyo!

    In any case you can find a very detailed explanation on the art's curriculum and division in several books, the best of which in my opinion (I contributed to the writing) is Antonino Certa Shihan's one: "Daito-ryu Aikibudo: History and Technique" which you can find on the net, for instance at Budovideos.com.

    As a general rule, in any case, Daito-ryu always deals with specific situations in categorized katas, not on the application of a certain "principle" on every possible conceivable attack. At Daito-ryu's higher levels of practice there are forms of training that "exit" from the kata, like oyo-geiko, henka or renzoku geiko.

    Best regards,

    Giacomo Merello
    Giacomo Merello

  10. #10
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    Default Aiki

    You live and learn...
    Simon Keegan 4th Dan
    www.bushinkai.org.uk

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    Judasilt: Thanks!

    Simon Keega: thanks for the imput and interesting post.
    Xichen
    Australasian Martial Arts & Self Defence Forums - http://www.ozmaforums.com

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    Default

    [Post deleted by user]
    Last edited by Nathan Scott; 12th June 2014 at 19:42.
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

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    Thumbs up The Daito-ryu curriculum after the Hiden Mokuroku

    Greetings!

    I am interested to know what the content of the DaitoRyu after you learn all of the the Hiden Mokuroku is, and I don't mean just the name of the various branches of learning, but the actual content, such as the techniques that may be involved, or perhaps the teachings. The Hiden Mokuroku exibits such richness that it is hard to imagine even more complex levels of learning within this excellent system! I will appreciate Your answers, as there is really not much information about this.

    p.s. I don't have any credentials in Daito Ryu and ask strictly as an enthusiast, thanks!

    Igor Lurye.
    Last edited by Nathan Scott; 12th July 2013 at 22:09. Reason: THREADS MERGED DUE TO SAME SUBJECT MATTER
    igor A. lurye

    "Carry water, chop wood, dream".

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    Default

    [Post deleted by user]
    Last edited by Nathan Scott; 12th June 2014 at 19:42.
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

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    Default Thanks for the response Nathan!

    Actually it does seem to answer my question even though i would probably have to become a member of a school or a study group in order learn more.

    Sincerely,
    Igor Lurye.
    igor A. lurye

    "Carry water, chop wood, dream".

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