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Thread: Fixing loose tsuka-ito

  1. #1
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    Default Fixing loose tsuka-ito

    Hello,

    Im new to this forum. But i had a question. I have heard that it is possible to have loose tsukamaki fixed by a professional by him unwrapping the loose end and re-wrapping it tighter. Is it possible for this to happen?

    Have a good one.

    David Torez

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    The problem would be that once the knot is tied, the loose ends are cut off. Trying to rewrap and then retie the short ito would be difficult.

    However, ito is not that expensive, compared to the cost of the craftsman's time, so having it rewrapped with new ito is probably the best way to go.

    HTH.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens
    The problem would be that once the knot is tied, the loose ends are cut off. Trying to rewrap and then retie the short ito would be difficult.

    However, ito is not that expensive, compared to the cost of the craftsman's time, so having it rewrapped with new ito is probably the best way to go.
    A total rewrap would definitely be recommended, though it also depends on how loose the ito is. If it's not unraveling, and just shifts a little bit, you can use white glue. Put a dab of white glue on a toothpick, then spread the white glue under the loose part of the ito, between the ito and the same. That'll keep it in place for a while. I normally do this anyway when I get a sword that has silk or cotton ito.

    Jay
    Jose "Jay" Mijares
    Nakamura Ryu Batto-Do -- Kenshinkan Dojo (San Francisco Bay Area)

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by davidtorez
    Hello,

    Im new to this forum. But i had a question. I have heard that it is possible to have loose tsukamaki fixed by a professional by him unwrapping the loose end and re-wrapping it tighter. Is it possible for this to happen?

    Have a good one.

    David Torez
    Where did you hear that? Given how long it would take to do the knots at the end with nothing to hold onto (not to mention how very difficult it would be), it would be faster (and vastly better) to just rewrap the whole thing in new ito.

    I have fixed knots that have started to come apart just a bit and that can be a royal pain. Needle nose pliers, lots of swearing, and then a few drops of superglue strategically placed. But total unwrapping? No way.

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    Thank you. So, what you guys are saying is that it "would" be possbile to just rewrap the loose end, but it would be very hard and very time consuming?

    Have a good one.

    David Torez

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    Sure, it's "possible." It's just not practical.

    I doubt you'd find any professional willing to do it. It's simply not a workman-like way to do the job. It'd be like asking an electrician to splice together ten 5-foot sections of old wire rather than using a 50-foot section of new wire. What would be the point?
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    You would be surprised of what an electrician would do Brian. Yes I am an electrician. Seriousness aside; rewrap the whole thing with a new ito. That’s the best.
    Steffen Gjerding
    Kakudokan dojo

    Yup, lousy english

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    Hi David

    Something to consider is to weigh up the overall quality of the sword in question. If the sword is a low end, then the rewrap cost could exceed the cost of a new sword.

    A few strategically place drops of epoxy glue under the loose areas may fix the problem in the short term.

    I ideally a rewrap with new ito is the best option but just way up the the overall expense and time and decide which option best fits time, budget etc.

    Cheers

    Jason
    Jason Anstey

    "I'm not very smart but I can lift heavy things"

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    Thanks for the answers. To answer your question Brian, the point would be to save time and money I suppose, althought as everyone mentioned, the job might not be as good.

    Have a good one.

    David Torez
    Jeremy Hagop

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    Quote Originally Posted by jezah81
    ...To answer your question Brian, the point would be to save time and money I suppose, althought as everyone mentioned, the job might not be as good. ...
    Just be aware, it almost surely would not save time, and time is money.

    Trying to tie a tight knot when you have essentially no bitter ends with which to work would be an exercise in frustration. It would be much faster to rewrap the tsuka in new ito, tie a good knot, and then cut off the ends, than to try to do the same with the ends already cut off.

    It's not a matter of the job not being "as good," it's that trying to do it with too short an ito would likely result in a job that was unacceptable, and would come undone with any even moderately hard use.

    If for some reason you just can't get a rewrap done properly, then don't do it at all. Just glue down the loose ito and then coat the whole thing over. There is precedence for that, although I don't care for it myself.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    [Moderator hat on]
    Uh, "David" --

    Why is your third post coming across as being written by Jeremy Hagop?
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Sorry! Me and my flatmate share the same computer and forgot to log out the last time he went off!

    Have a good one.

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