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Thread: Human Weapon

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisMoon
    This theory falters in that the Takenouchi Ryu dojo in question is not a judo dojo nor is there even a fragment of a sporting element to it.
    No you did not understand my post. Muay Thai (the combats sport) show had the host go to study Muay Boran (ancient art) and Krabi Kabong which are the for runners of Muay Thai. Muay Thai Chaiya (A form of Boran) does not have a sporting element. For judo (The combat sport) they are going to vist a jujutsu (ancient art) dojo to see its roots. They picked Take no uchi ryu. Now for ninpo, yes you could have it be the ancient art, but what combat sport would they feature?
    In other words what DDATFUS said.
    Last edited by shinbushi; 3rd August 2007 at 20:33. Reason: saw DDATFUS's post

  2. #32
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    Default Human Weapon

    I don't know how many of you have seen this new show on The History Channel, but it is interesting. I've seen two of the three episodes so far. The first was Muy Thai, the second Arnis and the third was Okinawan Karate.

    I watched the karate episode that aired tonight. I was thrilled to see that they visited Higa Seikichi for a portion. (Somewhere on this site I have a picture of him posted.) His students wearing the same logo that I wear and they performed Naihanchi Shodan and the bunkai. I was privileged to train with him in 2001 at the 25th Anniversary NTS in Lansing, Michigan.

    And they were fitted for gi's at Shureido and you can see Kenzo Nakasone, Owner, who visited us for the 30th Anniversary last summer. For a one hour show, I think they did a credable job in showing some history, some technique and some action. I have to give the producers a thumbs up!
    Respectfully
    Mark W. Swarthout, Shodan

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackwood
    I don't know how many of you have seen this new show on The History Channel, but it is interesting. I've seen two of the three episodes so far. The first was Muy Thai, the second Arnis and the third was Okinawan Karate.

    I watched the karate episode that aired tonight. I was thrilled to see that they visited Higa Seikichi for a portion. (Somewhere on this site I have a picture of him posted.) His students wearing the same logo that I wear and they performed Naihanchi Shodan and the bunkai. I was privileged to train with him in 2001 at the 25th Anniversary NTS in Lansing, Michigan.

    And they were fitted for gi's at Shureido and you can see Kenzo Nakasone, Owner, who visited us for the 30th Anniversary last summer. For a one hour show, I think they did a credable job in showing some history, some technique and some action. I have to give the producers a thumbs up!


    I saw it tonight, I liked it. It was a whole different than fight science. Too bad it was only for an hour.
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

  4. #34
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    Default Future Episodes

    I'm looking forward to seeing some of these! I want to see the Marine Corps Martial Art. I didn't see the second episode, evidently it was Eskrima and not Arnis.

    * Muay Thai: Ultimate Striking
    * Karate
    * Judo: Samurai Legacy
    * Eskrima Stickfighting
    * Savate Streetfighting
    * Pankration: The Original Martial Art
    * Krav Maga of the Israeli Commandos
    * Marine Corps Martial Arts
    * MMA - America's Extreme Fighting
    * Kung Fu
    * Sambo: Russia's Extreme Fighting
    * Bokator: Cambodian Blood Sport
    * Silat: Martial Art of Malaysia

    The History Channel has some good clips and brief summaries on their site.
    Respectfully
    Mark W. Swarthout, Shodan

  5. #35
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    I watched the karate episode that aired tonight. I was thrilled to see that they visited Higa Seikichi for a portion. (Somewhere on this site I have a picture of him posted.) His students wearing the same logo that I wear and they performed Naihanchi Shodan and the bunkai. I was privileged to train with him in 2001 at the 25th Anniversary NTS in Lansing, Michigan.

    And they were fitted for gi's at Shureido and you can see Kenzo Nakasone, Owner, who visited us for the 30th Anniversary last summer. For a one hour show, I think they did a credable job in showing some history, some technique and some action. I have to give the producers a thumbs up!
    Respectfully
    Mark W. Swarthout, Shodan

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinbushi
    In other words what DDATFUS said.
    See, if all of you just went ahead and realized that I'm always right, it would save everyone here a lot of time

    When I first watched the show, I felt like the stated purpose was something like: "I'm going to spend one week studying an art that you could spend a lifetime learning in order to add it to my mad blend of skillz and become teh deadliest man alive, and while I'm at it I'll spend two days studying an ancient, combative art so that I can use it to improve my scoring ability in the sport." An attitude, needless to say, which I find obnoxious.

    However, having watched more of the show, I feel like they are making a real effort to show some of the history and culture of the arts that they are showcasing (hence the time spent studying a non-sportive predecessor). I really appreciate the chance to get a window into some of the groups that they have shown, and on the whole the show has been a great resource for learning a bit more about certain arts.
    David Sims

    "Cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum." - Terry Pratchet

    My opinion is, in all likelihood, worth exactly what you are paying for it.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackwood
    I watched the karate episode that aired tonight. I was thrilled to see that they visited Higa Seikichi for a portion. (Somewhere on this site I have a picture of him posted.) His students wearing the same logo that I wear and they performed Naihanchi Shodan and the bunkai. I was privileged to train with him in 2001 at the 25th Anniversary NTS in Lansing, Michigan.

    And they were fitted for gi's at Shureido and you can see Kenzo Nakasone, Owner, who visited us for the 30th Anniversary last summer. For a one hour show, I think they did a credable job in showing some history, some technique and some action. I have to give the producers a thumbs up!
    I must admit, I was also excited to see our kata and kihon kata being
    shown. We are of a school that does not see much as far as publicity.
    How lucky these two were to have so much historical exposure! Though
    I did not agree with 100% of the history, I agree, it was a good attempt.
    Ray Baldonade
    Chibana-ha Shorin-ryu

    "Love many, trust few and do wrong to none". Chan Yau-man

  8. #38
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    The show is interesting, if only a little hoaky in spots -- last evening was good because they were on Okinawa. I am not happy that some of the Okinawa Ti sensei allowing such sportie-karate to now affect their methods. But, that is their business.

    I wish they would have visited some shorin ore goju dojos, but the Uechi demonstrations were nice. I remember working out with some of those guys, way back 47 years ago, and was impressed with how rough and tough they trained. Of course, back then all Okinawa Ti (karate) was a serious business.

    I actually found a very light-weight 1" board and broke it in half with my fingers last night!! What an idiot, but after decades of not breaking my hand still performed well.

    Dusy-over the hill-Mars

  9. #39
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    Years ago, Archebeque, who is a legitimate old time karate guy from Washington State, was going for a Guiness record involving breaking river rocks. He busted his knuckles on the very first one.

    At the other extreme, there was another guy who set up a breaking demo for the TV show "That's Incredible!" Host John Davidson accidentally bumped into the stack, and everything shattered. Seems that the special effects guys had forgotten to tell John that everything had been dipped in liquid nitrogen, thereby making the pieces about as brittle as crystal.

  10. #40
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    I've been most impressed with these guys attitudes. I figured it was going to be "I'm an American badass and I'm gonna pick up this system with no problem and kick the champion's butt"

    what I've seen so far is two guys who are out to learn a "little something" about other martial arts, to get a small taste, and come away with a genuine life experience. they've been extremely polite and attentive and very respectful to the teachers.

    I was tickled pink to see them wearing white belts in the karate episode. I don't care if you've got a 10th degree in 8 different MAs, if you're visiting someplace that you are going to be a student, and you have no rank there, the white belt goes on. KUDOS to them!!!
    Matthew White
    Jiyushinkai Aikibudo
    Oklahoma City, OK

  11. #41
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    Overall, I definitely appreciate the historical and cultural background offered. After all, it is the "HISTORY" channel.... And I actually like the computer generated explanations of the physics, though the producers are obviously going out of their way to give max. numbers and stats to "wow" the viewer.
    Last edited by Iai-nut; 11th August 2007 at 13:54.
    Jonathan Lee

  12. #42
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    Last night watched the Savate episode. It was really cool that they had some of the real old timers, along with footage from their younger years, including the man credited with helping it survive WWII. Yeah, the fight at the end was sort of lame like most of them, but I really liked the rest of the show. Good history and some practical application.
    Respectfully
    Mark W. Swarthout, Shodan

  13. #43
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    Beg pardon, but is e-budo moderator Jason Chambers the same person in these shows... or is it just coincidence?
    Jonathan Lee

  14. #44
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    Coincidence.
    ____________
    Aric Keith

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iai-nut
    Overall, I definitely appreciate the historical and cultural background offered. After all, it is the "HISTORY" channel.... And I actually like the computer generated explanations of the physics, though the producers are obviously going out of their way to give max. numbers and stats to "wow" the viewer.
    Yes, this is a step up from some other attempts to represent the arts. The historical and cultural perspective is nice, along with the pragmatic and fair representation of many lineages and styles considering that it's an hour-long show with only about 30-45 minutes of actual time to pack information in. I'm sure some practitioners of the arts can find flaws but overall I think everyone can agree they made a very respectable effort to get the viewer into the feeling of the styles.
    Ossu,
    Jack Peterson

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