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Thread: Kalua Pig and Kalua Pig Fried Rice

  1. #1
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    Default Kalua Pig and Kalua Pig Fried Rice

    This is a great recipe for those who like roast pork, and for guys who can't cook or who dislike cooking. The total prep time for the Kalua Pig is about 20 minutes, and it's hard to screw up the recipe since it's very simple. The bonus, once the pig is in the oven, You have lots of time to sit around drinking beers while the pig cooks.


    First you need:

    Kalua pig.

    An inauthentic (but still good) recipe.

    4-5 lb. pork loin or shoulder
    2 tablespoons Wright’s hickory smoke seasoning
    2 tablespoons Hawaiian red salt or sea salt
    Note: You can use more smoke and salt, most recipes do, but this is better balanced in flavor to my taste buds using less salt and smoke.
    Equal amounts of chicken broth and water combined, about 12 oz
    3 whole medium size bananas or several banana leaves
    4 bay leaves
    Foil to cover the pan

    Stab the pork with a fork or knife all over so the salt and smoke will penetrate the meat. The deeper you stab, the more flavorful the pork will become. Thoroughly rub the meat with the hickory smoke and then the salt, coating evenly as possible. Put the bay leaves on top of the pork, then wrap the pork in banana leaves. Cover the pan tightly with foil and place in a 325 degree preheated oven. Cook for about 45 to 60 minutes per pound of meat. For a 4lb pork butt, about 3 to 4 hours.

    If you have no banana leaves, place the meat in a roasting pan and top with the whole bananas with a couple bay leaves under the bananas and a couple under the roast and cook as above.

    About half way through cooking time, add about 1” of the combined chicken broth and water to the bottom of the pan. Recover tightly with foil and continue cooking. When done, the meat should fall apart easily when prodded with a fork.

    Throw out the bananas and shred the meat with two forks and pour in the remaining combined chicken broth and water. Let the meat rest and soak up some of the added liquid. Then serve with rice on top of steamed cabbage, make sure you add some of the liquid to each serving, making sure to cover the cabbage.

    You can do this recipe with chicken breasts, or a turkey breast as well. Reduce the cooking time to about 40 minutes per pound of meat, and to keep the meat moist, you can add a bit of olive oil or bacon fat to the broth in the pan.

    You can also insert cloves of garlic into the meat prior to cooking. I prefer not to do this, but if you want to, go for it.

    --

    Kalua Pig fried rice

    8 oz of Kalua pig
    About 3 cups of left over rice
    1 shredded carrot
    4 to 8 oz. of roughly shredded cabbage, more if you like veggies.
    1-1/2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 tablespoon mirin
    2-3 tablespoons of soy sauce.
    1/8 tspn white pepper
    3-4 eggs - scramble the eggs with 2 teaspoons of soy and 1 teaspoon of mirin added before scrambling, rough chop into bite size pieces and set aside for later addition to the fried rice.
    1/8 to 1/4 tspn Sesame Oil

    Heat the frying pan and add the olive oil, wait until the oil is starting to smoke in the pan. Add the rice breaking up clumps. Then add 2-3 tablspoons of soy sauce and 1tblspn mirin, and stir until the rice is pretty uniform in color and the rice has absorbed the liquid. Taste and season with more soy or mirin if needed, you can also use a bit of vegetable broth to deepen the flavor.

    Add the cabbage and carrots, mixing so the rice will not burn, until the cabbage is wilted. Add in the pig and heat well. Add the egg. Now, create a 2-3” space in the middle of the pan and sprinkle in the white pepper. Watch out, it will smoke and make you cough! When the pepper is smoking pretty heavily, mix well to combine the pepper with the rice. This will create a nice smoky background in the fried rice. Add the sesame oil and stir well. Serve for breakfast with some bacon (for those craving more fat), and some diced fruit.

  2. #2
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    Great idea the next time I have my girl come over for dinner I will be using this thanks a bunch Neil
    Chris McLean
    Martial Arts student

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Yamamoto View Post
    Kalua pig.

    An inauthentic (but still good) recipe.

    3 whole medium size bananas or several banana leaves
    If you have no banana leaves, place the meat in a roasting pan and top with the whole bananas with a couple bay leaves under the bananas and a couple under the roast and cook as above.

    Just to be clear, is that with peels, or without?
    Aaron J. Cuffee


    As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.
    - H.L. Mencken

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    Aaron,

    Whole bananas peels included. Just give them a good through washing.

    When the pig is done, the bananas will be an ugly blackish brown, looking like something a dog may have left on your lawn. Doesn't matter, you are going to throw them out, and it's the flavor the bananas add that is what you want.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Yamamoto View Post
    Aaron,

    Whole bananas peels included. Just give them a good through washing.

    When the pig is done, the bananas will be an ugly blackish brown, looking like something a dog may have left on your lawn. Doesn't matter, you are going to throw them out, and it's the flavor the bananas add that is what you want.
    I kinda thought that Neil-not that it matters too much; there's a pretty good source for banana leaves in Albuquerque, and I'm gonna modify your recipe by using a roasting bags (and maybe I'll share Jeff Cuffee's "Haha, I fooled you, no it's not smoked Brisket."...... made with a bit more Liquid Smoke.......)

    I just wanted to make sure Chris was clear for the GF's dinner...though he shouldn't have too much trouble getting leaves in Houston.

    Thanks though.
    Aaron J. Cuffee


    As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.
    - H.L. Mencken

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    Oh, I forgot, you can do this in a slow cooker as well. Same prep as above, but cook on low heat about 16-20 hours. I've yet to try this version though, for the simple reason the smell would drive my wife and I, not to mention our dog, nuts.

    Banana leaves are pretty readily available up here too, as are ti leaves for use in place of foil. We have a large Hawaiian population in Seattle, and a couple stores specializing in Hawaiian goods and foods.

    But, to make it easy for anyone reading with out easy access to those, I suggest the bananas and foil version.

  7. #7

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    Hey, Neil, great recipe. My wife and her family from the Big Island loved it although they did want a bit more smoke and salt...

    And the slow cooker version worked fine too. What I did is bought a large, boneless pork shoulder and cubed it down into 2 inch cubes first so it would cook more evenly (hence more quickly). Then basically poured the liquid smoke and salt over it and mixed well in a bowl. I put a couple bay leaves on the bottom of the slow cooker, put down the pork cubes as an even layer, then put the bananas on top and poured about 1/2 the liquid over it to help with the heat transfer in the crock. Low setting for about 6 hours. I added the rest of the liquid after the 6 hours, removed the bananas, stirred it up a bit, then let it go until everything wanted to break down on its own. About 3 hours more in my case. But low in my crock pot seems a bit higher than most... So YMMV.

    You could probably cut a few hours by going on high for the first few hours then cutting it back to low to finish.

    But it worked fine. Good, simple recipe.

    And the dogs loved it too. All day long they were "hanging out" in the kitchen just hoping the crock pot was going to spontaneous eject some of the juicy meaty stuff...

    Kalua pig, a bowl of rice, and a couple frosty beers...

    Now where is a good laulau recipe?

  8. #8
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    What? Someone actually tried this out? I post these recipes as a joke!

    Thanks Keith for posting your results, I'm glad people like my booze and food posts.

    Note, I did say I go lighter on salt and smoke, but you can always add more salt and smoke, it's hard to take it out.

    I do have a salmon-pork-chicken laulau recipe. Let me find it and I'll post it. I've never tried it so I have no idea if it's any good or not.

    Up at Kona Kitchen, the cook, Taylor, is from Kuaui and does a killer pork adobo from his grandma's recipe. He uses cinnamon to balance out the vinegar. He did a pork tofu stir fry that was better than my grandma's and mom's. Ono stuff if anyone ever gets up Seattle way. Now, since he swears he's going to come train with the TNBBC, I can make him give me the recipes.

  9. #9

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    Hey, the more recipes the better. Every time we fly out to visit family in Hilo I come home 10 pounds heavier. They don't eat until they're full -- they eat until it hurts...

    Of course the first time I visited family a few decades ago I discovered laulau. Then I also discovered that the leaves they use seem to have a laxative effect... No wonder they thought it was so funny the haole was eating so many...

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