Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17

Thread: Is Less More...?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    NYC, NY, USA
    Posts
    341
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Is Less More...?

    Greetings,

    Am I the only one that finds we are beseiged with more and more interference, for our own good, in our lives from government?

    Don't get me wrong, we need a standard fire code and a durable construction code, but do we need to be legislated on common sense issues. For example, my personal perference is ride a bike, or motorcycle, with a good, safe helmet. However, do I need the state to tell me it's mandated for my own good? Are they doing it, so that the state can catch you bareheaded and collect revenue for detecting this non-compliance, and providing more civility for the 'haves', and robbing the pockets of the those that can afford it the least?

    If you want to protect bikers from themselves, than have it covered in the insurance policies that riding without decent helmets forfeits your right to compensation for head injuries and so on.

    I am sick and tired with the 'haves' legislating the rest of the populace so that some kind of monetary fine can be collected, which comes from the working class, and usually benefits the 'haves'.

    I firmly think that less government is better goverment. Any thoughts?

    Tom
    Tom Militello
    "You can't hide on the mats." Terry Dobson sensei.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,809
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    But Mr. Militello, whatever will we do without the government to protect us from ourselves?
    David F. Craik

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    NYC, NY, USA
    Posts
    341
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Less May Be Droll

    Mr. Craik,

    Thank you for the perfect droll response to my thread. Yes, I'm ranting over what the petty (and not so petty) fines are doing to life in NYC. It seems there are more laws, can't do's, parking meters and so on in our fair city and all I know is that the same Mayor that wants to give all sorts of services to the poor, makes the working class pay for it. And while we are paying for it the 'haves' get more, like the free commutes for the 'haves', their spouses AND significant others.

    Regards,
    Tom
    Tom Militello
    "You can't hide on the mats." Terry Dobson sensei.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,809
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    For what it's worth, I agree completely.
    David F. Craik

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    6,226
    Likes (received)
    117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyK View Post
    ...For example, my personal perference is ride a bike, or motorcycle, with a good, safe helmet. However, do I need the state to tell me it's mandated for my own good? Are they doing it, so that the state can catch you bareheaded and collect revenue for detecting this non-compliance, and providing more civility for the 'haves', and robbing the pockets of the those that can afford it the least?

    If you want to protect bikers from themselves, than have it covered in the insurance policies that riding without decent helmets forfeits your right to compensation for head injuries and so on. ...
    The problem with that approach is that the taxpayers are then stuck with the bill for caring for the uninsured, brain-dead but body-living biker who has an accident.

    The state is well within its rights, and its duty, to mandante seatbelt use for cars and helmet use for motorcycles for any who operate those vehicles on public roadways.

    If you don't like it, build your own private roads and do whatever you want on them.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    NYC, NY, USA
    Posts
    341
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Hmmmm....?

    Hi Brian,

    Thanks for your input, yours is an option, although not a viable one for most working class people. However, I get your point.

    That said, some of the e-budo crowd may remember a half baked idea some years ago that a legislator was trying to make seatbelts on motorcycles mandatory. Anyone that rides even a bicycle knows you don't want to be tied to the seat in an accident.

    Anyway, I do not want to make this a biker forum, my point applies to many things regulated by the government. We allowed them to put in parking meters in NYC and other big cities, ok, 25 cents for an hour...now most of them are 25 cents for 20 minutes. And, instead of being on the shopping street, they are now extended to some blocks away, and so on. I was only using helmets as an example.

    Regards,
    Tom
    Tom Militello
    "You can't hide on the mats." Terry Dobson sensei.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    3,324
    Likes (received)
    48

    Default

    At the price of real estate in Manhattan, why not charge for it? The idea there is to get people to quit taking private cars downtown.

    Outside downtown, usually cheaper parking is still available, if you're willing to walk a couple blocks.

    The thing is, people want the services.

    * People on workers comp say they can't afford to got the doctor or the physical therapist unless workers' comp pays their time off work and/or their mileage, and their lawyers won't let them return to work unless they get at least a year's worth of college from their injury.

    * People want to retire at age 55, but the Social Security needs to be big enough that they can continue driving their Suburban 80 miles a day.

    * Government workers want cost-of-living raises.

    * Neither kids nor parents are clamoring for conscription laws. Yet, this would save billions of dollars, because with conscription, you don't need expensive ad campaigns, and there is no reason to pay a private more than $90 per month, or a second lieutenant more than $300 a month. (They get a big pay raise if they reenlist.)

    * Drivers want no potholes in the street, but there can't be any tolls on the road.

    * Chickenhawks want John McCain in Iraq until at least 2013, but don't want Lake City arsenal increasing production from 900,000 rounds per year in 2001 to 2 billion rounds per year in 2006

    * Welfare mothers expect DSHS to send them the amount IRS was rebating taxpayers.

    * People terrified of their shadows want your underwear searched at the airport.

    * And let's not forget the two million people in jail at any given moment. Even if the food sucks and the prisoners are living in tents, the guards still get paid union scale.

    Etc.

    Meanwhile, referendums indicate that they can't raise the sales tax. They can't raise the property tax. They can't raise the gas tax. They can't raise the income tax. So, where is this money to come from?

    Simply printing more money is not the answer, because even that costs money. The recent requirement to require US money to be Braille-compatible is going to cost a few hundred million over the next few years, but that's actually small potatoes. It takes forklifts and guards and armored trucks to deliver pallets of quarters and dollar bills to the basement of the Federal Reserve.

    So, the easy answer is to tax things that people don't have to use. If you don't want to pay the toll on the toll road, use a different route. If you don't want to pay the parking fee, buy a bus pas. If you don't want to pay the $275 fine for speeding through the construction zone, don't speed through the construction zone.

    As for the motorcyclist, the simple thing is to change the law so that if you are not wearing a helmet, your estate becomes personally liable for all excess costs. So, if your brain injury costs the state half a million over the course of your life, that's what your estate is required to pay. True, 16-year-olds don't have much, but if you're married, the state takes your house, your car, and slaps a lien on 50% of all your wife's income earned until such time as she divorces you. (At which time, they get 50% of the value of all real property in the marriage.) If nobody comes and visits you, so what? You're brain dead, you don't care. As it is, though, you're saying that taxpayers need to pay a million dollars just so that you can say, "I don't need no stinkin' government."

    A very common thing in parts of Washington, this -- people who say they hate the government getting outraged when their workers' comp or child support payment check isn't there on the exact day that it came last month, delivered to the door by a Postal Service employee in Postal Service truck. And true horror is when workers' comp refuses to pay for their Oxycondone any more, meaning they will have to buy it themselves, using their tax-free time-loss check.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    399
    Likes (received)
    6

    Default

    A very common thing in parts of Washington, this -- people who say they hate the government getting outraged when their workers' comp or child support payment check isn't there on the exact day that it came last month, delivered to the door by a Postal Service employee in Postal Service truck. And true horror is when workers' comp refuses to pay for their Oxycondone any more, meaning they will have to buy it themselves, using their tax-free time-loss check.
    LMAO I'm keeping this one Joe!
    Zachariah Zinn

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    NYC, NY, USA
    Posts
    341
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Hey Joe...Come for a Visit!

    Hi Joe,

    I do not know when you were last in NYC, but our illustrious millionaire mayor intends to make Manhattan a gated community for the yuppies. I live in an area adjacent to Manhattan and if they had that congestion parking I really would be squeezed between a rock and a hard place.

    As it is, I have trouble parking my car, and when I can avoid an alternate side of the street parking ticket, or a fine for being a few inches too close to the mandatory 15 feet free zone around a hydrant, or 3 minutes over the parking meter fine, or too close to the corner fine and so on, I do so.

    We have Traffic agents enforcing these regulations, including checking registration and inspection stickers, as do the members of the NYPD. THERE IS A $100 FINE BEING PROPOSED IF YOU FAIL TO CLEAN UP AFTER YOUR DOG. Where will it stop? And by the way, my nearby subway station and ride into Manhattan is already overcrowded, where will all the people from Long Island park, as there is no room in my area and how will they commute in, on my overcrowded train?

    Trade Washington for NYC and see what I mean, come and visit! (You can always stay in my son's old room.)

    Rest Regards and utmost respect,
    Tom
    Tom Militello
    "You can't hide on the mats." Terry Dobson sensei.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    6,226
    Likes (received)
    117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyK View Post
    ...THERE IS A $100 FINE BEING PROPOSED IF YOU FAIL TO CLEAN UP AFTER YOUR DOG. ...
    Good!

    If people can't be bothered to clean up after their dogs, they should keep them at home.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    399
    Likes (received)
    6

    Default

    THERE IS A $100 FINE BEING PROPOSED IF YOU FAIL TO CLEAN UP AFTER YOUR DOG.
    What exactly do you suggest as an alternative? That people should simply be allowed to let their dogs crap everywhere, or that the fine should just be less? Should there also not be fines for littering?
    Zachariah Zinn

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Bedford, England
    Posts
    1,201
    Likes (received)
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyK View Post
    Greetings,

    Am I the only one that finds we are beseiged with more and more interference, for our own good, in our lives from government?

    Don't get me wrong, we need a standard fire code and a durable construction code, but do we need to be legislated on common sense issues. For example, my personal perference is ride a bike, or motorcycle, with a good, safe helmet. However, do I need the state to tell me it's mandated for my own good? Are they doing it, so that the state can catch you bareheaded and collect revenue for detecting this non-compliance, and providing more civility for the 'haves', and robbing the pockets of the those that can afford it the least?

    If you want to protect bikers from themselves, than have it covered in the insurance policies that riding without decent helmets forfeits your right to compensation for head injuries and so on.

    I am sick and tired with the 'haves' legislating the rest of the populace so that some kind of monetary fine can be collected, which comes from the working class, and usually benefits the 'haves'.

    I firmly think that less government is better goverment. Any thoughts?

    Tom
    Throw all the drugs laws into that mix as well.

    Dirk

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Charleston, IL USA
    Posts
    441
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    Steve Martin had a good way to deal with over-population...death penalty for parking tickets.

    That being a bit extreme, the mindset might help a bunch of deadbeats get off their hind ends!
    With respect,

    Mitch Saret

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    301
    Likes (received)
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dirk.bruere View Post
    Throw all the drugs laws into that mix as well.

    Dirk
    And what's wrong with the drug laws. The fact that they are there or the penalties?
    I for one agree with the drug laws (I enforce them), but do concede that some penalties are over the top (Rockefeller Drug Laws).
    Tony Urena

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    3,324
    Likes (received)
    48

    Default

    Tom --

    My first experience of NYC in 1980 was the Greyhound bus station at 3:00 a.m. Left town, heading north to Boston, right up scenic Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard at sunrise. Nice neighborhood.

    My next experience of NYC was in 1999. Mediocre Chinese food down in Mott Street but some really good Japanese food out in Yonkers. Most of the time in the city was in the Brownsville area of the Bronx. I got to drive because it was a rental car, and the locals didn't want to take their cars there. Expensive parking, and you do want to keep feeding the meters, no doubt about that.

    As major urban areas go, Portland (Oregon) is starting to grow on me.

    Tony --

    The easy fix for the drug laws is to legalize most of the drugs. If you're 21, you get to buy it at the store, same as you do your booze and cigarettes. Then sin tax the hell out of it.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •