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Thread: iaijutsu and kenjutsu

  1. #31

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    You're going to have to train in it a bit to see it and be able to appreciate what is going on...it has the subtleties of any koryu.

    There are countless variations that revolve around a few principles. There is not going to be one single answer for every single question.

    As for the one handed techniques, why would any koryu sword practitioner go with one hand in a particular instant of an encounter...distance.

    In regards to what the other hand is doing, Okinawan guards/ Udundi practitioners carry the sword out of the obi. Practice is ambidextrous. The saya is in the other hand. Udundi Iai uses the same concept as bringing the tsuka forward on approach and then applying sayabiki to advance the timing of the draw. Only, the draw and reach is not limited to the saya being in the belt, the sword can completely be moved towards the opponent, or anywhere for that matter, and then the saya stripped off the sword.

    Motobu Udundi is an intense study of ma ai and ashi sabaki. As with any koryu, a certain degree of commitment to it has to happen in order to appreciate it.

    Rob Rivers
    Rob Rivers

  2. #32

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    Also, read George Kerr's "Okinawa, History of an Island People". I'm one of the loonies who has read the thing cover to cover several times (its a text book...).

    Okinawa has had firearms, swords of Chinese, Japanese, and European origin, and all other manner of weapon for hundreds of years.

    Beginning with the weapon ban of the Okinawan King in the late 1500's and the subsequent 1609 Satsuma ban, what weapons do you think they were banning? Documents from the early 1600s document the records of the inventories taken by the Japanese of the Okinawan storehouses to include firearms (the Portuguese had been trading with the Ryukyus since the 1400s), swords, spears, etc.

    Needless to say, there were weapons...and the only people who think that a sai, for example, was a pitchfork, are the Westerners. The Okinawan masters do not all facilitate all of the "Okinawan farm tool" rhetoric.

    All the best

    Rob Rivers
    Rob Rivers

  3. #33
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    Mark Bishop's weapons book goes into all this and much more and should be available in the next couple of weeks.

    regards
    Michael Powell

  4. #34
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    Aug 2003
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    Mike,
    Greetings. Long time no hear. Do you have the title, publisher and if possible the ISBN of Mark Bishops long anticipated new book?

    Regards
    Chris Norman

  5. #35
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    I know this thread is a little old, but for those of you that are interested Hamamoto Sensei now has a website. Here it is: http://hachimanryu.web.fc2.com/english.html

  6. #36
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    Nov 2007
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    Twinsburg, OH
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    I met Hamamoto Sensei in Okinawa this past April while visiting the Budokan in Naha. We looked in and here he came to talk and visit a little. Nice man even offered to allow us to train unfortunetly we didn't have any of our stuff with us this particular day. His students were good!!
    Yours in Karate-Do,
    Brandon Fisher
    Okinawa Karate of Twinsburg
    Twinsburg, OH

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