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Thread: Firearms-Is it Truly a Martial Art?

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    Default Firearms-Is it Truly a Martial Art?

    Given the varying definitions of martial art, could firearms be a martial art weapon needing the same diciplines as un-armed/traditional martial arts?
    Richard Scardina

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rickster View Post
    Given the varying definitions of martial art, could firearms be a martial art weapon needing the same diciplines as un-armed/traditional martial arts?
    This is going to be another one of those long threads. But, maybe it does not have to be. Your answer is in your question. Given the varying definitions of "martial art", yes, [proper] firearms [use] "could" be a martial art needing the same disciplines as unarmed/traditional martial arts. Or, a firearm could be considered a martial arts weapon. I guess the length of the discussion to follow might focus on "should" it be considered that way. In the case of most of my fellow work mates, firearms are a tool. We don't treat it as our "soul" or something like that (as a nihon-to might be treated, I guess).

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    Though a thread may seem as
    one of those long threads", it, like any other, is a rhetorical exchange of what a forum is for.

    Martial arts, as with its string of ancroynms, terminology, etc., seem to create curiousity and discussion of many sorts.
    Richard Scardina

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    I think if you look into history the Japanese did in fact make it a martial art. I know Jeff Hall has devised a martial art around the pistol.

    Duane
    Duane Wolfe

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    Duane Wolfe

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    I don't like the term "art" especially when referring to modern military disciplines. IMO it should be referred as martial (or military) "techniques."
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rickster View Post
    Though a thread may seem as
    one of those long threads", it, like any other, is a rhetorical exchange of what a forum is for.

    Martial arts, as with its string of ancroynms, terminology, etc., seem to create curiousity and discussion of many sorts.
    It does indeed seem to create curiosity in some. I hope you find your answers in this thread then.

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Kohler View Post
    I don't like the term "art" especially when referring to modern military disciplines. IMO it should be referred as martial (or military) "techniques."
    A hoplologist that I know described what the bushi practiced in the 1400's and 1500's as "martial training" or "martial disciplines" and described what those same arts became in the peaceful 1600-1800's as "martial arts." Based on that, I would label modern military and police training as a martial practice/training/discipline, but would consider referring to other gun-based activities as martial arts. I've seen some competitive shooting events, for example, that seem to have a large following but not to be directly linked to any military/police application. Folks who train with guns with the specific goal of excelling at those competitions rather than with the specific goal of using the gun for combat might have some interesting parallels with the practitioners of certain martial arts that have a meditative or sporting rather than combative focus.
    David Sims

    "Cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum." - Terry Pratchet

    My opinion is, in all likelihood, worth exactly what you are paying for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DDATFUS View Post
    A hoplologist that I know described what the bushi practiced in the 1400's and 1500's as "martial training" or "martial disciplines" and described what those same arts became in the peaceful 1600-1800's as "martial arts." Based on that, I would label modern military and police training as a martial practice/training/discipline, but would consider referring to other gun-based activities as martial arts. I've seen some competitive shooting events, for example, that seem to have a large following but not to be directly linked to any military/police application. Folks who train with guns with the specific goal of excelling at those competitions rather than with the specific goal of using the gun for combat might have some interesting parallels with the practitioners of certain martial arts that have a meditative or sporting rather than combative focus.
    Hmmmn, but many other virtues of martial arts are not restricted to etuher way.
    Richard Scardina

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rickster View Post
    Hmmmn, but many other virtues of martial arts are not restricted to etuher way.
    Sir, what is your personal opinion on this matter? I'm referring to the original premise of your question that initiated this thread.

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    Well, to some, firearms is a modern implement wheras it did have martial art relation via one particualr Samurai period.

    I would have to say that anything given the discipline study of defense could almost be a martial art.
    Richard Scardina

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    This is not so different from the "Is snooker/billiards a sport or a game?" debate.

    Snooker needs a certain amount of physical skill, but a lot of that skill is quite refined rather than energetic, like football say.

    Games generally need little gross physical ability whereas sports do.

    Some shooting "arts" such as the cross country skiing and shooting sport, involve more physical activity than others. Is that more like a martial art than shooting in a range? You might have to argue that it isn't since the sport is more about hunting game.

    Still, you raised a good question.
    Jonathan Adrian Treloar
    Perception is strong, Sight is weak - Musashi
    Right forearm is strong, Sight is weak - Treloar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duanew View Post

    He forgets to mention the "insulting the memory of slain police officers during shooting AARs," as well as one or two off range, drunken live fire events he has participated in - but perhaps that's not part of the "Hojutsu Ryu" curriculum.
    Kit Leblanc

    In Harm's Way

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    HI

    Morishige Ryu is still in existence today and they are a Japanese gun school

    see them here

    http://zaitetstu16.seesaa.net/article/94030475.html
    Paul Richardson - Shidoshi
    Bujinkan Lincoln Dojo

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    Quote Originally Posted by poryu View Post
    HI

    Morishige Ryu is still in existence today and they are a Japanese gun school

    see them here

    http://zaitetstu16.seesaa.net/article/94030475.html
    So, it is a martial art in many virtues....
    Richard Scardina

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