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Thread: Firearms-Is it Truly a Martial Art?

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    Default Firearms-Is it Truly a Martial Art?

    Given the varying definitions of martial art, could firearms be a martial art weapon needing the same diciplines as un-armed/traditional martial arts?
    Richard Scardina

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rickster View Post
    Given the varying definitions of martial art, could firearms be a martial art weapon needing the same diciplines as un-armed/traditional martial arts?
    This is going to be another one of those long threads. But, maybe it does not have to be. Your answer is in your question. Given the varying definitions of "martial art", yes, [proper] firearms [use] "could" be a martial art needing the same disciplines as unarmed/traditional martial arts. Or, a firearm could be considered a martial arts weapon. I guess the length of the discussion to follow might focus on "should" it be considered that way. In the case of most of my fellow work mates, firearms are a tool. We don't treat it as our "soul" or something like that (as a nihon-to might be treated, I guess).

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    Though a thread may seem as
    one of those long threads", it, like any other, is a rhetorical exchange of what a forum is for.

    Martial arts, as with its string of ancroynms, terminology, etc., seem to create curiousity and discussion of many sorts.
    Richard Scardina

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    I think if you look into history the Japanese did in fact make it a martial art. I know Jeff Hall has devised a martial art around the pistol.

    Duane
    Duane Wolfe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duanew View Post
    I think if you look into history the Japanese did in fact make it a martial art. I know Jeff Hall has devised a martial art around the pistol.

    Duane
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ID:	11163 Correct. The firearm has played a major part in many battles throughout Japan since the 16th Century. This school/tradition called Morishige Ryu is several centuries old and is still taught and practise in Japan today. They use the Hinawaju (long rifle), Tanzutsu (pistol) and Oozutsu (Canon). It is also taught in Australia by the Oukatai group.
    Matt White

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    Duane Wolfe

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    I don't like the term "art" especially when referring to modern military disciplines. IMO it should be referred as martial (or military) "techniques."
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Kohler View Post
    I don't like the term "art" especially when referring to modern military disciplines. IMO it should be referred as martial (or military) "techniques."
    A hoplologist that I know described what the bushi practiced in the 1400's and 1500's as "martial training" or "martial disciplines" and described what those same arts became in the peaceful 1600-1800's as "martial arts." Based on that, I would label modern military and police training as a martial practice/training/discipline, but would consider referring to other gun-based activities as martial arts. I've seen some competitive shooting events, for example, that seem to have a large following but not to be directly linked to any military/police application. Folks who train with guns with the specific goal of excelling at those competitions rather than with the specific goal of using the gun for combat might have some interesting parallels with the practitioners of certain martial arts that have a meditative or sporting rather than combative focus.
    David Sims

    "Cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum." - Terry Pratchet

    My opinion is, in all likelihood, worth exactly what you are paying for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duanew View Post

    He forgets to mention the "insulting the memory of slain police officers during shooting AARs," as well as one or two off range, drunken live fire events he has participated in - but perhaps that's not part of the "Hojutsu Ryu" curriculum.

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    HI

    Morishige Ryu is still in existence today and they are a Japanese gun school

    see them here

    http://zaitetstu16.seesaa.net/article/94030475.html
    Paul Richardson - Shidoshi
    Bujinkan Lincoln Dojo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rickster View Post
    Though a thread may seem as
    one of those long threads", it, like any other, is a rhetorical exchange of what a forum is for.

    Martial arts, as with its string of ancroynms, terminology, etc., seem to create curiousity and discussion of many sorts.
    It does indeed seem to create curiosity in some. I hope you find your answers in this thread then.

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    Default Be the Bullet

    I say that shooting IS a martial arts skill, and a student can achieve and eventually master the mechanics of its discipline or in simpler terms, putting the bullet exactly where you want it. Beyond that, one must combine these shooting mechanics with the zen aspect of a proper mindset.

    It's sort of hard to explain, but when I was shooting competitive "action" pistol, I rose from a beginner class to the higher levels and then reached an impasse... and I remained in this "rut" for an uncomfortably long period of time.

    A GrandMaster shooter broke me out of this "rut" by using a zen style teaching approach and I went beyond the "mechanical" or "muscle" skills and started to use my mind... my inner spirit in conjunction with the skills that I had. It worked... my shooting grew faster in speed of shot placement and remained highly accurate. Everything "flowed"... it felt right.

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    But, is shooting a actual acquired skill that anyone can achieve? It would seem that it requires hand/eye coordination, like someone who can sketch and paint.
    Richard Scardina

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rickster View Post
    But, is shooting a actual acquired skill that anyone can achieve? It would seem that it requires hand/eye coordination, like someone who can sketch and paint.
    I would say absolutely.
    Just like anyone can learn to sketch and paint, but not everyone can be a Rembrandt.
    Joe Stitz

    "Black belt and white belt are the same, white belt is the beginning of technique. Black belt is the beginning of understanding. Both are beginner belts."
    - Doug Perry -Hanshi, KuDan -Shorin Ryu ShorinKan

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    Quote Originally Posted by JS3 View Post
    I would say absolutely.
    Just like anyone can learn to sketch and paint, but not everyone can be a Rembrandt.
    Yes. Just like some of my past martial art classmates and students. Some couldn't do certain methods/moves, whereas others could do. But the beauty of martial arts is within the variety of styles to have one adapt and deveop.
    Richard Scardina

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