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Thread: Close quarters grappling in sword schools

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    Default Close quarters grappling in sword schools

    Greetings all.

    I am trying to find out any information on which kenjutsu ryūha that still have close quarters grappling in their syllabi.

    I'm not referring here to "unarmed man faces swordsman" techniques (muto dori?).

    Rather, I am looking for information on techniques that would be applied when the distance between two swordsmen gets close enough to allow grappling, throwing or locking techniques.

    Thus far, I believe that the Araki-ryu contains some of these techniques but I'm interested in finding out if there are traces of it left anywhere else.

    If my description above is unclear, googling "ringen am schwert" will give you the WMA version.

    Kind regards
    Benny MacArthur

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    I suspect that most koryu sword arts taught a certain degree of "contingency" grappling for situations like you're describing. From the little I've seen, Kashima Shinryu has a lot of this type of thing. Takenouchi Ryu, which specialized in armored and armed grappling, would be another great place to look for more information, as would any of the other grappling-oriented schools such as Araki Ryu, Kiraku Ryu, etc. Jikishinkage Ryu has several kodachi kata that involve an element of grappling. Hope that helps.
    David Sims

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    Tennen Rishin Ryu
    Ben Persons

    "Kimi ga yo wa, ama no hagoromo mare ni kite."

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    Takenouchi ryu is the most complete I can think of: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQXtTxJ7_nA

    Also Kashima shin ryu (this group doesn't practice the jujutsu that comes with it though):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elUrjvbxeYY

    There are others but not much videos available.

    Most Sigmund Ringeck wrestling techniques have their equivalent in a style or another. I think most people would have reverted to their jujutsu or sumai (sumo wrestling, which was immensly popular at the time) skills when entering grappling range. There are also techniques where one simply let go of his sword or polearm to attack with the knife or short sword.

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    Although not usually considered a kenjutsu school, Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu has a number of grappling techniques.
    無雙直傳英信流・日本古武道居合研究会 - Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu ・ Nihon Kobudo Iai Kenkyukai
    東京蘆洲会 - Tokyo Roshukai

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    Yagyu Shingan Ryu Heihojutsu has plenty.

    Regards

    Simon Louis

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    Wow - thanks for all the feedback - especially M.Chouinard's video clips.

    Kind regards
    Benny Macarthur

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    What about Katori Shinto Ryu? It has jujutsu in its curriculum too.
    Alejandro Villanueva.


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    Yagyu Shinkage Ryu .. .. of course
    Richard J. Smith

    Yamato Yagyu Kai

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    A sword art with a jujutsu grappling element is simply a sword art that expressly practices the jujutsu element. IMHO.

    I feel that having a Koryu Jujutsu style in and of itself would be just as useful. The sword element is derived from simply adding in that extra variable.
    Respectfully,
    Johnathan Pierson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Spinelli View Post
    Although not usually considered a kenjutsu school, Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu has a number of grappling techniques.
    Are these still preserved and practiced? I've seen only a couple (not that I know much about MJER....), mostly escapes / counterattacks to someone grabbing a tsuba or saya.

    Takeuchi ryu has a whole raft of these techniques at various levels of skill and complexity.
    Lance Gatling ガトリング
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lance Gatling View Post
    Are these still preserved and practiced? I've seen only a couple (not that I know much about MJER....), mostly escapes / counterattacks to someone grabbing a tsuba or saya.
    I'm not sure how widely practiced they are, but 6 sets (53 kata)* of paired waza dating from Oe Masamichi and older have been preserved. I cannot give you an exact number of how many kata involve some sort of armed grappling, but some form of grappling is present in every set I have seen.

    *Tachi Uchi no Kata (7), Tachi Uchi no Kurai (10), Tsume Ai no Kurai (11), Daisho Tsume Ai no Kurai (8), Daisho Tachi Zume no Kurai (7), and Daiken Tori (10).
    無雙直傳英信流・日本古武道居合研究会 - Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu ・ Nihon Kobudo Iai Kenkyukai
    東京蘆洲会 - Tokyo Roshukai

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    Quote Originally Posted by PiersonJ View Post
    A sword art with a jujutsu grappling element is simply a sword art that expressly practices the jujutsu element. IMHO.

    I feel that having a Koryu Jujutsu style in and of itself would be just as useful. The sword element is derived from simply adding in that extra variable.
    My memory is that some of the jujutsu got separated from the sword, and went on until Judo came along and absorbed them, and then lost a lot when it got olympicized. I think some of those schools may still survive, but not many now. I once knew a scot who'd trained in one, in scotland, but that was a few years ago and I don't remember the style. Just the pain.
    Trevor Johnson

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    Fredrik Hall
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    Just to confuse the issue some more: the kodachi kata in kendo. And of course Itto Ryu (from which these kata are derived)
    Andrew Smallacombe

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    JKA Tokorozawa

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