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Thread: Which martial art would you recomend for self defense

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    Default Which martial art would you recomend for self defense

    Hello everbybody. I am intersted in learing am martial art or self defense system to protoct my self on the street. Following martial arts are tought in my hometown

    karate
    krav maga
    jiu jutsu
    Wing Tsun
    Takewondo
    Hapido

    Which of these martial arts would you recomend? Or would your recomend something else.


    Greetings from Austria

    Peter Pirker

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    Quote Originally Posted by agent00 View Post
    Hello everbybody. I am intersted in learing am martial art or self defense system to protoct my self on the street. Following martial arts are tought in my hometown

    karate
    krav maga
    jiu jutsu
    Wing Tsun
    Takewondo
    Hapido

    Which of these martial arts would you recomend? Or would your recomend something else.


    Greetings from Austria

    Peter Pirker
    Hey Peter,

    This is a question that has been asked many times before and one that can be hard to answer. A lot of it depends on your training goals. If I may make a recommnedation for you, I would suggest visiting this site: http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/ I apologize in advance to the moderator if posting this link breaks protocol...just wanted to help the guy out.

    It has some good information in it that may be able to address the question you proposed. Others in this forum (which have way more experience than me) will be able to help out. Good luck with your search.
    Sincerely,

    Eric Joyce
    Otake Han Doshin Ryu Jujutsu

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    Quote Originally Posted by agent00 View Post
    Hello everbybody. I am intersted in learing am martial art or self defense system to protoct my self on the street. Following martial arts are tought in my hometown

    karate
    krav maga
    jiu jutsu
    Wing Tsun
    Takewondo
    Hapido

    Which of these martial arts would you recomend? Or would your recomend something else.


    Greetings from Austria

    Peter Pirker
    It massively depends on the clubs teaching it. Krav maga, and jiujitsu/jujutsu may be more inclined to cover 'self defense' material, but some styles of these there are quality control issues, the best thing is to visit the schools, try a few lessons and see if you have to sweat and enjoy it.

    The main 'self defense' benefit in martial arts is stress reduction, and cardiovascular and muscle conditioning, put simply self defence includes heart disease.

    If you want to protect yourself from street violence there are easier, cheaper and faster options then learning a martial art. The main ones being your lifetyle and home/work address.
    Paul Greaves
    ''Skill is aquired via sweat equity''

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    Quote Originally Posted by bu-kusa View Post
    If you want to protect yourself from street violence there are easier, cheaper and faster options then learning a martial art. The main ones being your lifetyle and home/work address.

    I agree with my E-Budo colleague here. This is a debate that is always topical! If you want to learn to be safer and "defend yourself" then why not do a Self-defence course or if you want a better, deeper level of skill then look at a combatives practice.

    It isnt about which martial art; pick one that suits you and you feel comfortable with; ethically and physically. The dojo and the teacher are extremely important also.

    If you are naturally thick set and prefer "hands on" then why not consider Judo or another grappling art? The martial Art is in some ways not important. Any art, properly taught and properly practised will be of great benefit when you have acquired a reasonable level of skill through years of dilligent study. A "traditional" martial art doesn't teach you how to fight, it teaches you how not to.

    You need the skills and tactics and the knowledge, calmness and discipline how to use them. A budo will develop these but you will (or should) make any "fighting method" your own.

    Enough of my ramblings...
    Jeffrey W. Goodwin.

    "It is easy to kill someone with a slash of a sword. It is hard to be impossible for others to cut down".
    Yagyu Munenori (1571 - 1646)
    Samurai & bodyguard to the Shogun.

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    Smile A good martial art for defense...

    Not all martial arts are STRICTLY used for defence only...so if your looking for a martial art with defense as its main point...then i would say jujitsu

    1. It redirects your attackers force and turns it against them.
    2. It does not require you to be a certain build (muscular,slim etc)
    3. it is an all-round martial art making it effective at all quarters (close,afar,ground)

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    Default How about good ol' Smith&Wesson-ryu?

    As kids we used to joke that nothing really beats Gun-a-te.

    One of us would take a karate stance. "Kah-rah-te!!!!"
    Another would take a Bruce Lee stance: "I beat you with gung fu! Woo-tah!!!"
    Another would take hanmi, "Aikido! Yah!"

    Then a wise guy would point their index finger at us, thumb straight in the air, other fingers curled into a fist. "Gun-a-te!! Bang! Bang! You guys are all dead!"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHdEbRDdMiI


    Wayne Muromoto

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    I know it was a joke, but I hear that response all the time.

    "Why do you do that martial arts crap? If someone wanted a piece of me, I'd just whip out my [insert gun here]!"

    Obvious legal issues aside, my response is usually "oh really? Do you have your gun on you now?" Answer is always "no" or "It's in my car" or something similar. "Really now? So that gun doesn't do you much good does it? *punch them in the face*"

    I don't really punch them in the face , but I think the point still stands. Yes, carry a gun when you can, but you won't always have it on you. Then what?
    Brett Guillory
    5th kyu GWNBF
    9th kyu KJJR

    Brett's as green as they come." - J. Chambers

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    Default Joke/No Joke

    Yes, it's a joke. On the other hand, jokes often carry a grain of truth. The last thing you want to do is carry a chip on your shoulder because you do martial arts. That attitude of false bravado can lead to a confrontation in which, alas, some young, foolish "martial arts student" thinks he can beat someone with his blue-belt skills and instead is false-cracked, shot, stabbed, and/or gang-piled. That's about as bad as thinking you really are safe packing...but the gun is at home.

    Guns certainly aren't the 100% salve for individual protection, indeed. But in an encounter, one should assume that YOU don't know what weapon someone has on his body, guns included. The danger for many sports-oriented folk, as Kit LeBlanc notes, is that sports gears your head to do some stuff that could literally get you killed; like if you did judo you'd think your opponent is going to grab you a certain way. Or if you did karate you think you would square off, get into a stance and punch and kick (note the YouTube videos of early BJJ folk jumping on karate guys in intra-dojo matches and dragging them unceremoniously to the ground), or if you did aikido, of COURSE the guy is going to run at you and swing a shuto chop or grab your wrist. On the other hand, with kata-oriented systems, you do miss the effect of...if you do X and the guy wants to do Y what now?....(on the other hand, in our system, there are counters to counters, and variations on basic moves that take that into account).

    Final note: as others have said, IMHO there's no one single "style" that will make you unbeatable in self-defense situations. You need to look at the situation from the total, overall view...Like, well, don't walk down a street if you know it's dangerous and full of criminals, if you can help it. Move to a safer neighborhood. Get more sane friends who don't go out looking for trouble. Get in shape. Learn to run fast away from danger. Be mentally prepared and disciplined. Yada yada. Doing a martial system is only one part of the total equation.

    Wayne Muromoto

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    If you're truly worried, then yes, you carry the piece everywhere. I used to train in a karate class where most folks kept their piece in the gym bag, in the dojo, while training. The instructor sometimes wore his piece even during the sparring. Of course, he made sure there wasn't a round under the hammer, or the next chamber, as he didn't want to lose anything important if kicked there during sparring. Another fellow kept the 12 gauge in the dojo. Okay, it wasn't right at hand, but it was close enough.

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    Default Wha?????

    J.C. Penny, Joe, where'd ya train???? Clint Eastwood-town???

    Wayne

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    Default DeNiro-ryu

    You lookin' at me, sempai? You lookin' at me?

    Wayne Muromoto

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    Nah, both those were in the greater Seattle area.

    That said, I also used to be a regular at a country and western bar. Guns were legal in that particular part of the world, so most everybody carried. (Except the guys I was with; our employer only let us carry at work.) Anyway, one night, this drunk kept dropping his .38 on the floor. I turned to the fellow next to me, another regular, and said, "Now what do you need to bring your gun here for?" He lifted his coat, showed me his nine, and said, "Didn't want to leave it at home. Somebody might steal it." I couldn't argue with that, so I put both hands on the bar, slowly, in plain sight, and said, "Buy my friends here a drink."

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    Well, some people do have their guns on them most if not all the time, and not just cops. But some segments in the firearms and shooting communities point out the same idiocy in the thinking that goes "I don't need to know how to fight, I have a gun, what is he going to do to me?"

    Well, perhaps take it from you and feed it to you muzzle first??

    Empty hand skills may be the deciding factor as to whether you ever even access your gun or use it effectively. Many a police officer has been disarmed and murdered with his own weapon because his hand-to-hand skills were not effective in retaining the firearm.

    RE: Sports - very true, but in accepting the premise that sports may make us default/do things we don't want to do because of how we are conditioned by the practice ("you fight the way you train"), then we must also accept that kata practitioners will have a very difficult time actually hitting/damaging anyone in a real fight because they generally pull their strikes and don't follow through on damaging locks to their uke.... I have visions of a "joint shattering" arm lock stopped because the practitioner never actually shatters an elbow in practice, and a stomp kick hovering over the downed attacker's head but never actually connecting because it is always stopped there in training....

    This is of course stretching the issue... but "training scars" are certainly very real. Therefore, the more we mix our training methodologies, add different elements to work on different skill sets and follow through, the more we can shape what we do to the encounter.
    Kit Leblanc

    In Harm's Way

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    Quote Originally Posted by agent00 View Post
    Hello everbybody. I am intersted in learing am martial art or self defense system to protoct my self on the street. Following martial arts are tought in my hometown

    karate
    krav maga
    jiu jutsu
    Wing Tsun
    Takewondo
    Hapido

    .. SNIP...
    Hey Peter,

    I will say find a good Master instead of a specific MA (Martial-Art). I wanted to learn the Chinese way and hated the Japanese way because all Indian learn Karate and hate Chinese way. I am still not learning Karate but in other way I am. I am learning Goju-Ryu way of exploring the human limits, and my Master taught me so many fundamental things of Japanese arts that that I think any fighter must know. 2nd, After I watched the Black Belt movie, I fell in love with Gojy-Ryu , now also thinking of learning defense using Japanese weapons.

    There is one question you need to ask though: sports or fighting and then find a good Master, Master is the one who will make you love or hate the art.
    Last edited by arnuld; 11th March 2010 at 09:34. Reason: addition

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    Quote Originally Posted by wmuromoto View Post
    You lookin' at me, sempai? You lookin' at me?

    Wayne Muromoto
    You're looking at me, but your'e not LOOKING at me ...

    I guess I lead a sheltered life. From my, admittedly limited experience, I'd say that 99.99% of the time, simply remaining situationally aware, avoiding dangerous (or stupid) situations and people, moderating drink and avoiding mind-altering drugs have kept me mostly violence-free for these 53 years.

    And of the times it didn't, I was either professionally engaged in said violence or off the job, I was responsible for it through my own stupidity and carelessness.
    Chuck Gordon
    Mugendo Budogu
    http://www.budogu.com/

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