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Thread: Is it really needed?

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    Default Is it really needed?

    Why, as I dicuss many things with other martial artists, do some think they have the need to make or buy into Dit Jao or some other homemade remedy?

    Isn't modern medicine good enough or far better?
    Richard Scardina

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Scardina View Post
    Isn't modern medicine good enough or far better?
    Usually, although in some cases modern medicine is "rediscovering" some old methods; "Integrative Health Care" or "Complimentary Alternative Medicine."

    In most cases, though, I think it's just an attraction to the "old school" and "mysterious oriental secrets" aspect.

    Just as guns are "good enough or far better" than swords for most modern purposes, yet we choose to practice classical martial arts; so too with oriental medicine.

    (I keep Dit Da Jao and Tiger Balm in the medicine cabinet next to the Alieve and Neosporin, BTW.)
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    So, having Dit Da Jao is like having a sword. The point I am making is. It is not a neccesity. It is a myth or has a taste for eccentricity, a affectation sense for the past linked to a particular subject, in this case, martial arts. This is a whimsical idea to attach to nostagic eras.

    I dont see martial artists looking to boil Salix alba; Salix nigra in about 200 mls of water and create an infusion to relieve pain. In other words, make homemade aspirin.

    I dont see martial artists looking to make homemade anything but the Dit Da Jao.
    Richard Scardina

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    I make my own chiisai (sp?) but I get your point.
    Chris Thomas

    "While people are entitled to their illusions, they are not entitled to a limitless enjoyment of them and they are not entitled to impose them upon others."

    "Team Cynicism" MVP 2005-2006
    Currently on "Injured/Reserve" list due to a scathing Sarcasm pile-up.

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    I want to emphasize, making, buying, or using Dit Da Jau, isnt a "bad" thing. I think it is a "fad" thing.
    Richard Scardina

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    I don't think it's a fad per say as it is somthing that does not have an equivilant in modern medicine.

    One of my instructos students (i say student, he is a 7th dan) is an orthopedic surgeon and he gives Jow that he uses to his patients. If it's good enough for him it's good enough for me.
    Joe Stitz

    "Black belt and white belt are the same, white belt is the beginning of technique. Black belt is the beginning of understanding. Both are beginner belts."
    - Doug Perry -Hanshi, KuDan -Shorin Ryu ShorinKan

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    Not a matter of it being good enough. The issue is, is it really a neccesity without alternatives?
    Richard Scardina

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Scardina View Post
    Not a matter of it being good enough. The issue is, is it really a neccesity without alternatives?
    In your first post in this thread you wrote, "Isn't modern medicine good enough or far better?"
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Kohler View Post
    In your first post in this thread you wrote, "Isn't modern medicine good enough or far better?"
    That was about modern med being good enough.

    Why degrade to a lower form of med and suggest that it is good enough
    Richard Scardina

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    Why would it be a lower form of medicine?
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Kohler View Post
    Why would it be a lower form of medicine?
    In lu of folk remedy verses modern.

    Like medical field per its advances verses old tradition
    Richard Scardina

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Scardina View Post
    That was about modern med being good enough. Why degrade to a lower form of med and suggest that it is good enough
    I think you should look more deeply into traditional medicine. Although modern allopathic medicine has its place, traditional medicine also has a place. Allopathic methods are better for some things, but herbology, osteopathy, accupuncture, etc. are better for others.

    Let's not throw out the baby with the bath water.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens View Post
    I think you should look more deeply into traditional medicine. Although modern alopathic medicine has its place, traditional medicine also has a place. Alopathic methods are better for some things, but herbology, osteopathy, accupuncture, etc. are better for others.

    Let's not throw out the baby with the bath water.
    I can agree to a certain extent. However, society is more about advance methods.

    If the baby is medicine, and the advancement of, there were actually a lot of babies saved/born in modern medicine than without. Throw out the bath water, because advances are made not only in medicine, but society. Are we to practice these antiquated methods for shear vagary?
    Richard Scardina

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Scardina View Post
    ...Are we to practice these antiquated methods for shear vagary?
    Not neccesarily, although that is one aspect for some people. Another is that it is sometimes simply more appropriate.

    Modern medicine has given us much that is good, but also much that is bad; think thalidimide babies, MRSA, etc. for examples.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens View Post
    Not neccesarily, although that is one aspect for some people. Another is that it is sometimes simply more appropriate.

    Modern medicine has given us much that is good, but also much that is bad; think thalidimide babies, MRSA, etc. for examples.

    I wonder how many babies suffered thalidimide, MRSA in comparison of those save by C Section, induced labor, vacinations, etc.
    Richard Scardina

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