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Thread: The Most Essential Principles of Budo: Structure

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    Default The Most Essential Principles of Budo: Structure

    A while back, over on Aikido-L (for those who remember it!) we were discussing the most important principles of Aikido. I ended up boiling the question down even further and wondering what the most essential principles of budo are. These would be principles that are essential no matter what art you studying. My first one is structure, and I wrte this blog post in regards to it.

    http://budobum.blogspot.com/2014/06/...s-in-budo.html

    What do you think? Did I miss something even more essential?
    Last edited by pboylan; 26th June 2014 at 16:45.
    Peter Boylan
    Mugendo Budogu LLC
    Fine Budo Books, Videos, Clothes and Equipment Direct from Japan
    http://www.budogu.com

    Find my Budo Blog at http://budobum.blogspot.com/

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    Good food for thought. A couple of areas with which I could quibble (an old English terming meaning 'pole vaulting over mouse turds') but good.

    Classic judo practice did involve a lot of that centering / kuzushi practice; most often it's not such a focus today, taking a second seat to modern competition techniques.

    Lance Gatling

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    It's ironic that centering and kuzushi practice has been lost, because I suspect it would make competitors much more effective.
    Peter Boylan
    Mugendo Budogu LLC
    Fine Budo Books, Videos, Clothes and Equipment Direct from Japan
    http://www.budogu.com

    Find my Budo Blog at http://budobum.blogspot.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by pboylan View Post
    A while back, over on Aikido-L (for those who remember it!) we were discussing the most important principles of Aikido. I ended up boiling the question down even further and wondering what the most essential principles of budo are. These would be principles that are essential no matter what art you studying. My first one is structure, and I wrte this blog post in regards to it.

    http://budobum.blogspot.com/2014/06/...s-in-budo.html

    What do you think? Did I miss something even more essential?
    Hello Mr. Boylan,
    I read your blog post. I'm glad you got to meet Howard. He's a great guy. The one thing I'd add to your post is that I'd describe "structure" as "martial structure". The difference being that good structure can be used while sitting, walking, etc. It's a definitive physical posture to help the body carry loads and weight. For example, slouching would violate good structural posture.

    But, good martial structure can violate good posture and still remain martially strong and solid while yet being dynamic, fluid, and mobile. It's a very pronounced difference in the martial world. This is the ability to remain strong, solid, fluid, mobile against an opponent's force all the while bent over, angled, hunched over, twisted, etc so that you can still deliver power through unarmed or with a weapon.

    Mark

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