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Thread: Starting multiple martial arts at once

  1. #1
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    Default Starting multiple martial arts at once

    There are 3 arts that I would like to start to study, Kendo, Iaido, and Seibukan Jujutsu. I just turned 31, and I'm wondering If it would be too much to study all 3 arts at once.

    I started on the path of Mahayana Buddhism 4 months ago, and I like the zen qualities of Iaido, and Kendo, and the practical combat aspects of Kendo and Jujustu.

    Any insight is greatly appreciated.

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    Apologies if this question was posted in the wrong section.

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    Firstly, kendo has very little practical application in modern times.

    Secondly, seibukan looks to me like just another eclectic modern thing, not sure what you are intending to get out of it. It doesn't look practical to me, just based on a quick glance at their web page.

    Lots of people study both kendo and iaido. Just from a time management point of view, adding a third thing would be problematic for most. Most people can barely commit to one.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

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    I only meant that Kendo was practical in competition duels. There's no letting up as there is in sparring.

    Seibuken Jujutsu was what I practiced when I was a kid. Turns out it's no longer offered in my area, but there is a Kokodo Jujutsu dojo.

    That's true about most people not being able to commit to one. Kendo and Iaido are what I really want to learn, but for whatever reason it doesn't feel right learning those arts without learning one that isn't based on weapons.

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    Quote Originally Posted by twice
    Kendo and Iaido are what I really want to learn, but for whatever reason it doesn't feel right learning those arts without learning one that isn't based on weapons.
    Not sure why not, unless you are planning on a career as a soldier for hire, in which case you'd need to learn a lot more than an unarmed art. I tend to agree with Neil in that starting three different arts all at the same time is going to be very difficult. I would advise doing only two, and then adding the third one after a couple of years when you've gotten the basics of the other two in. Even two will be hard to handle, but it would be much easier than three.

    Of course, there's always the possibility that you're a natural and you'll pick it all up easily.

    Good luck with whatever you choose.
    Paul Smith
    "Always keep the sharp side and the pointy end between you and your opponent"

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgsmith View Post
    Not sure why not, unless you are planning on a career as a soldier for hire

    That's just what was instilled in me as a kid.


    Thanks for the replies

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    Quote Originally Posted by gendzwil View Post
    Firstly, kendo has very little practical application in modern times.
    Well, there is something very practical about learning to not freeze, and to move when something is coming at you.
    Joseph Dostie

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdostie View Post
    Well, there is something very practical about learning to not freeze, and to move when something is coming at you.
    Sure, I could list a number of practical benefits to kendo but if you are considering martial arts for self-defence it's not your first, second or third choice.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

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    I'm of the pick-one-and-master-it variety, so my advice may not be worth anything if one insists of studying multiple arts at once.

    At any rate, I recommend iaido only because it's what I've picked.

    - M

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    My wife trains in kendo, MJER iaido, & SMR jodo, with dan in each. I teach judo & European fencing, & train in MJER & SMR, also with dan. So while it's not impossible to learn multiple martial arts at the same time, I sure as heck wouldn't advise starting in them simultaneously!

    Ken
    Ken Goldstein
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    Judo Kodansha/MJER Iaido Kodansha/Jodo Oku-iri
    Fencing Master/NRA Instructor

    "A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it'll annoy enough people to be worth the effort."

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    I trained Seitei Iai from my Kendo teacher while learning MJER and SMR jo. I often act out of conditioned instincts. If I have to think my technique often goes to pot. MJER really kepted trying to change my Seitei Iai. Seitai and MJER share some waza but the character is different.

    Closer related the two arts are the more difficult it is for me. Judo and Karate at the sametime for example were never a problem. But I always rode the short bus to the dojo.

    My Ryukyu Kobudo teacher taught Shorin Ryu. I'm a Goju Ryu guy. Shorin Ryu and Goju Ryu at the same time was bad news. It open my mind to a lot of technique and ideas but I performed both arts poorly because the two arts use different body.
    Ed Boyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgsmith View Post
    Not sure why not, unless you are planning on a career as a soldier for hire, in which case you'd need to learn a lot more than an unarmed art. I tend to agree with Neil in that starting three different arts all at the same time is going to be very difficult. I would advise doing only two, and then adding the third one after a couple of years when you've gotten the basics of the other two in. Even two will be hard to handle, but it would be much easier than three.

    Of course, there's always the possibility that you're a natural and you'll pick it all up easily.

    Good luck with whatever you choose.
    I agree on this one. Invest some time on those 3 martial arts and with proper will, you will be proficient in all of them Take one step at a time, bro..

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    Quote Originally Posted by gendzwil View Post
    Sure, I could list a number of practical benefits to kendo but if you are considering martial arts for self-defence it's not your first, second or third choice.
    Why not? Your kiai developed by kendo will attract persons around in no time, and you will be safe. And no matter what art you practice, a good sensei will tell you to:
    1. not have a posture of a victim. And you can't say kendo is teaching you 'victim' postures.
    2. open your eyes around you, to avoid ... things. And zanshin is universal in any martial art.
    3. best defence is when you succeed to de-escalate a conflictual situation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derzis View Post
    Why not? Your kiai developed by kendo will attract persons around in no time, and you will be safe. And no matter what art you practice, a good sensei will tell you to:
    1. not have a posture of a victim. And you can't say kendo is teaching you 'victim' postures.
    2. open your eyes around you, to avoid ... things. And zanshin is universal in any martial art.
    3. best defence is when you succeed to de-escalate a conflictual situation.
    I didn't say kendo had no self-defence value. However, I have yet to meet a kendo sensei who had anything to say about real-world defence. We don't talk about de-escalation or situational awareness. Zanshin is not the same thing unless you are being obtuse.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derzis View Post
    Why not? Your kiai developed by kendo will attract persons around in no time, and you will be safe. And no matter what art you practice, a good sensei will tell you to:
    1. not have a posture of a victim. And you can't say kendo is teaching you 'victim' postures.
    2. open your eyes around you, to avoid ... things. And zanshin is universal in any martial art.
    3. best defence is when you succeed to de-escalate a conflictual situation.
    Speaking as someone who has taught and practiced Kendo in Japan since the early 1980's it has no self defence values whatsoever. The aim is to strike protected areas. Kobudo is directed "at' those unprotected areas. Having done Karate, Jujitsu, Kendo, Iaido to a yudansha level and licenced in kobudo, kendo would probably be my last choice. If attacked a large piece of 2x2 and a dark alleyway works well. You can do more than one art but you have to spend considerable time keeping them separate and not letting one run in to the other. The better you get the harder that is to do.
    Hyakutake Colin

    All the best techniques are taught by survivors.


    http://www.hyoho.com

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