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Thread: Tegata collection

  1. #16
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    Todd good catch. He won two honbasho out of three that were bookends and had a decent middle honbasho. I should have done a better job researching that. I'm sure Futahaguro was still fresh in the minds of the Council as well as a certain amount of fear of public perception of a non-Japanese Yokozuna. I can't believe it has been so long now. I think today the public would be shocked to see a Japanese Yokozuna... they wouldn't know what to do with themselves!
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  2. #17
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    Default Takanohana Koji 65th Yokozuna

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    So technically this isn't a tegata just an autographed shikishi, but the Yokozuna who autographed it was a big one, Takanohana! Takanohana is part of the Hanada family sumo dynasty that includes his father Takanohana Kenshi a powerful Ozeki from the 70's and 80's, his uncle Wakanohana Kanji I a Yokozuna in the late 50's and early 60's and his older brother and fellow Yokozuna Wakanohana Masaru. During his career Takanohana set a number of age related records and was one of the most successful Yokozuna in history with 22 championships. He began wrestling under the name Takahanada in his father's Fujishima beya along with his brother Wakahanada. Per his father the young Takahanada would only allowed to use his father's old shikona Takanohana if he reached the rank of Ozeki. Takanohana along with his brother and the Hawaiian Akebono would bring life back into sumo which had been fading in popularity in the late 80's and early 90's. The era would be known as the Taka-Waka era.

    After his retirement Takanohana was granted a single generation elder status and allowed to use his fighting name as his elder name. He is now Takanohana Oyakata. He is only the 4th Yokozuna given this privilege and the 3rd to take the honor (the impressive Chiyonofuji took the Kokonoe elder name instead of using his own fighting name). The Hanada family had many issues centered around the Taka-Waka brothers. Takanohana was accused of being brainwashed by his chiropractor which drove a wedge between his father, brother and himself. When his father passed away there was drama and controversy over which brother, the older Wakanohana who had left the sumo world or the more skilled Takanohana who remained in sumo should succeed their father and his estate. Takanohana also became outspoken over his mother's extramarital affairs she had. Eventually Takanohana took over his father's stable and renamed it Takanohana beya. Takanohana has been successful in losing a great deal of weight after his retirement. He went from a fighting 340 lbs to 200 lbs. He has published a weight loss book and he teaches fitness classes he calls Shicore (from shiko and core) based on sumo taiso and possibly yoga and taiji. http://www.shicore.info/index.html
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  3. #18
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    If memory serves me correctly, it was a young Takahanada who defeated an aging Chiyonofuji and cemented the yokozuna's retirement - an almost exact re-enactment of Chiyonofuji bettering Takanohana I years before.

    He was also the first rikishi to not drink from the Emperors Cup after his first basho win - police had warned the minor not to do it.

    The Hanada brothers were definitely gifted sumotori, but I'm sure their good looks ancestrytory had at least as much to do with their popularity. Nor will people thank me for reminding them that Takanohana also held a record for the most consecutive basho sat out.
    I'm also slightly dubious of his single generation elder status - the much maligned Asashoryu held more impressive records.
    Andrew Smallacombe

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  4. #19
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    Default Wakanohana (3rd) Masaru, 66th Yokozuna

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    This tegata belongs to Wakanohana the 66th Yokozuna and older brother to Takanohana the 65th Yokozuna. Wakanohana is named after his uncle the 45th Yokozuna Wakanohana Kanji I. There was a second Wakanohana Kanji who was unrelated to the Hanada family who was the 56th Yokozuna. He lived up to his name sake and made the sport's top rank. Even though he was older he was eclipsed by his more talented younger brother. Both brothers enter sumo at the same time and wrestled in their father's stable. Wakanohana only won five tournaments in his career and none while at the rank of Yokozuna. His career at the top rank was short and he suffered from many injuries. He had the third longest tenure at Ozeki before being promoted to Yokozuna (of the men who made it to the rank) and he is the 6th youngest Yokozuna to retire. Even though he lacked the success in the dohyo that his brother had, he did contribute to the sports popularity in the 1990's. It was often called the Taka-Waka era. Wakanohana was also the last Japanese rikishi promoted to Yokozuna.

    After his retirement Wakanohana resigned from the sumo world and became a TV personality, tried out for the NFL and opened now failed chanko restaurant chain. There was a great deal of controversy between Takanohana and Wakanohana when their father died. Wakanohana was the chief mourner at the funeral because he was the elder brother but Takanohana inherited the vast sumo estate since he was still an active member of the Sumo Kyokai.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  5. #20
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    Btw, sorry for taking so long to post this last tegata; work has been busy. I am in the process of finding some more tegata so hopefully I'll have more to post soon
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  6. #21
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    Default Musashimaru Koyo 67th Yokozuna

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    I just picked up four tegata over the weekend and I think this one is the most appropriate to start with because it is from the next Yokozuna in the list, the 67th Yokozuna Musashimaru. Musashimaru was one of the rikishi I first saw in 2001 and maybe the most influential to me. The man is massive at over 6'3" tall he weighed in around 518 pounds! I saw him in Washington DC up close in 2004 and was even more impressed with him. His head was the size of a normal man's torso it seemed. Musashimaru was the last of the great Hawaiian sumotori. He was well known and well liked for his face which resembles the famous samurai from the Bakumatsu Saigo Takamori. Musashimaru is an interesting ethnic mix of Tongan, German, Samoan and Portuguese and was originally born in American Samoa before his family moved to Hawaii. He won a total of 12 basho and competed against some of the best rikishi of the time including Akebono and Takanohana both Yokozuna with double digit honbasho wins. At the time of his promotion to Yokozuna he was highly regarded and praised for having never missed a basho up to that point.

    After he retired he took the famous toshiyori or elder name Musashigawa and he is the head of his own Musashigawa stable. This is actually a different Musashigawa stable than the one he wrestled for. The original Musashigawa stable was headed by former Ozeki Musoyama who changed the name to Fujishima stable. Musashimaru took up the old stable name as his own once this happened.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

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  8. #22
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    Christopher, thank you for this thread, you have made it a fascinating read. Good luck with the collection.

    I have some questions for you, if I may.

    Is there any significance given to which hand is used to make the handprint? I note that some are left, some are right. In the photograph with your opening post it is easy to imagine them going through hundreds at a time. Do you suppose they both hands alternately?

    My wife comes from Tokyo and was used to seeing rikishi from the local beya cycling by or perched on the tiny chairs in local cafe. Do you know which beya it might have been? I'd love to match it up to some of those stories above. She grew up in Asagaya-minami, in Suginami-ku. These days it is also known for its many anime studios and there is a recent shopping arcade opened that is dedicated to anime (themed restaurants, bookshops, cosplay outfitters, memorabilia, etc.).
    David Noble
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    For now, I'm just waiting for the smack of the Bo against a hard wooden floor....

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tripitaka of AA View Post
    Christopher, thank you for this thread, you have made it a fascinating read. Good luck with the collection.

    I have some questions for you, if I may.

    Is there any significance given to which hand is used to make the handprint? I note that some are left, some are right. In the photograph with your opening post it is easy to imagine them going through hundreds at a time. Do you suppose they both hands alternately?

    My wife comes from Tokyo and was used to seeing rikishi from the local beya cycling by or perched on the tiny chairs in local cafe. Do you know which beya it might have been? I'd love to match it up to some of those stories above. She grew up in Asagaya-minami, in Suginami-ku. These days it is also known for its many anime studios and there is a recent shopping arcade opened that is dedicated to anime (themed restaurants, bookshops, cosplay outfitters, memorabilia, etc.).
    As for the heya locations, you can view them on Google Maps: https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer...&oe=UTF8&msa=0
    Last edited by Todd Lambert; 12th February 2015 at 06:17.
    Nullius in verba

  10. #24
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    Hi David,

    You are correct, they make hundreds of tegata at a time. There isn't any significance as to which hand the rikishi uses or the color of the ink, either red or black. Some guys might have a certain preferance when making them but as a whole there are no hard and fast rules. I have heard some rikishi think the red ink is a lucky color compared to black. When a rikishi loses he gets a kuroboshi or black star so black can be viewed as an unlucky color for the more superstitious wrestlers. As for which hand, I think once his right hand gets tired he uses his left and vice versa. If you get to see multiple tegata from the same rikishi you'll also notice his hand writing getting more and more "abstract" (ok bad. wrist cramping) as he goes until the kanji are almost illegible. I haven't been able to get one yet but Hakuho has at times signed his tegata in Romanji. He's Hakuho, like Hitachiyama, he can do what he likes; who is going to stop him?

    Todd's map is probably the best way to find any local heya where your wife grew up. My guess would be it was the Haneregoma beya which recently merged into Shibatayama beya (in 2013 I think). Hanaregoma was a break off of Hanakago. When the break off happened Onokuni (see Yokozuna tegata above) went, too. Hanaregoma eventually absorbed it's parent stable Hanakago in 1985. Onokuni founded Shibatayama beya in 1999. The ichimon groups are very incestuous. This is all just a guess though.

    Cheers,
    Chris
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  11. #25
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    Thanks Todd, that was fun looking at the map.

    Thanks Christopher, there doesn't seem to be a heya close enough on that map, so perhaps it moved. She came to the UK in 1986, so that may count as ancient history for some . I was talking about the Taka-Waka story and she got really confused - until we realised she was thinking of the previous generation that used the name ... oops, how embarassing. She never watched much Sumo, but her Grandma would always have the TV tuned in to the channel covering a basho. Grandma liked the handsome young men with a bit of beef .
    David Noble
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    I'll think of a proper sig when I get a minute...

    For now, I'm just waiting for the smack of the Bo against a hard wooden floor....

  12. #26
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    Yeah the Taka-Waka story can get confusing. The first generation Takanohana and Wakanohana were brothers but Waka was much much older than his brother. I think Wakanohana fought in the late 1940's through the early 1960's and was Yokozuna. The much younger Takanohana fought in the 1970's and retired in '81 and made it to Ozeki. The next generation Taka and Waka were sons of the first Takanohana and both made Yokozuna. There were even stories circulating that the first Wakanohand and Takanohana were not brothers but father and son. Not sure I believe it but who knows? What's interesting is Takanohana I was the last man to beat the great Taiho and then the rising super star Chiyonofuji was the last man to beat Takanohana I. Near the end of Chiyonofuji's career the up and coming star Takanohana II beat him and Chiyonofuji retired soon after.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  13. #27
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    Chiyonofuji is the only yokozuna I ever really watched. In the UK channel 4 ran a weekly program about Sumo which did a good job of introducing the techniques, the rituals and the star rikishi of the day. It was a bit weird as they ran for several weeks but were in fact only covering one day of the basho per episode... meaning the basho they showed was stretched out to last weeks! Akebono, Konishiki and a lot of the people mentioned above were all active in these programs. Chiyonofuji was a fascinating athlete, who brought strategy and technique to help him defeat the bigger and stronger. I liked him.
    David Noble
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    I'll think of a proper sig when I get a minute...

    For now, I'm just waiting for the smack of the Bo against a hard wooden floor....

  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tripitaka of AA View Post
    Chiyonofuji is the only yokozuna I ever really watched. In the UK channel 4 ran a weekly program about Sumo which did a good job of introducing the techniques, the rituals and the star rikishi of the day. It was a bit weird as they ran for several weeks but were in fact only covering one day of the basho per episode... meaning the basho they showed was stretched out to last weeks! Akebono, Konishiki and a lot of the people mentioned above were all active in these programs. Chiyonofuji was a fascinating athlete, who brought strategy and technique to help him defeat the bigger and stronger. I liked him.
    I agree! Chiyo is my favourite rikishi for the reasons you mention. He possessed skill and determination, but also grace and dignity. From a female perspective he was quite gorgeous, with a boyish and charming demeanour -- an interesting balance to his “Wolf” persona in the dohyo.
    H. O'Donovan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kendoguy9;503692Takanohana...teaches fitness classes he calls Shicore (from shiko and core) based on sumo taiso and possibly yoga and taiji. [URL
    http://www.shicore.info/index.html[/URL]
    I didn't know Takanohana was doing this, and I find it particularly interesting because I also teach classes that combine sumo taiso and various traditional and martial arts exercises (my students LOVE shiko). I know there is (or was a few years back) a Sumo Kenko Taiso DVD, but I understood it was only sold at tournaments. Do you know anything about it, how well it went over with the general public, etc.?

    Thanks, Chris, for this fascinating thread and the beautiful tegata -- your time and effort are very much appreciated!
    H. O'Donovan

    "If you try and take a cat apart to see how it works, the first thing you have on your hands is a nonworking cat." (Douglas Adams)

  16. #30
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    Default Dejima Takeharu

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    Sorry for the delay in getting these next three tegata posted. I have another one coming soon so I wanted to make sure I am up to date posting here. These next three Ozeki ranked rikishi came out of the powerful Musashigawa Beya.

    First up we have Dejima Takeharu. Dejima was a collegiate sumo champion who went pro in 1996. His highest rank w Ozeki which he held for two years of his ten year career. He won one Emperor’s cup in 1999 where he beat both Yokozunas Akebono and Takanohana and then beat Akebono a second time in a playoff match. He also won all three of the special prizes that Basho as well. This was his only championship.

    Ten years after his debut he announced his retirement from the sport. He has remained in sumo as Onaruto Oyakata at the Fujishima Beya (formerly Musashigawa Beya).
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

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