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Thread: Practical vs Principles, Real vs Research

  1. #16
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    It depends on schedule. Usually it works out to once a week. I think I use better technique as a result. I don't muscle stuff as much because I have no strength to force things. I transition to plan B, plan C, plan D instead of trying too long to make plan A work. I think it helped me roll more smoothly.
    Ed Boyd

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  3. #17
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    Thanks Ed.

    Do you feel that your fine motor skills are negatively effected by the pre-exhaustion? Also, do you feel that the pre-exhaustion effects your mental state, or did it when you first started (induces panic, calm, whatever)?
    Al Heinemann
    www.shofukan.ca

  4. #18
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    No. All I'm doing is lifting to failure about an hour before class. It is just a matter of muscles feeling like jello. I'm clear headed and not exhausted. I just have no mucular strength. I also don't really overthink it much. This was just training advice I tried and liked.

    It is not like what my Karate Sensei and other LEO friends have disscussed with me about range training at academies where they run laps and lift and do calthenstenics induce fatigue and increasing heart rates then firing at target to see how it impacts sight picture and accuracy. Think of all numerous scenarios where an LEO may have to draw a weapon after a foot race or physical struggle.

    Never had any issues in Brzilian JiuJitsu with panic. I was a 40 something Judoka who thought BJJ was easier on the body then the pounding I started to take in Judo. By nature my ground game is patient. I conserve energy well. I would have 20 somethings who were in way better shape gas out on me while I maintain and control position and wait for opportunity. It irks me how the recent Judo rule changes have gutted Judo of a lot of the chess game.
    Last edited by CEB; 2nd September 2015 at 21:28.
    Ed Boyd

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  6. #19
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    Ambiguity is huge when trying to make the gear change from cooperative to competitive/non-consensual combatives training.

    One of the best--and really the only safe/reliable--methods that I've found for working through combatives to higher and higher levels of stress, adrenaline, etc. is to provide very clear structures for both training participants. This means setting up an OpFor / Blue Force arrangement where each side has competing goals, though these goals may not necessarily be the same.

    An example:

    OpFor attempts to gain a grapple with Blue Force, proceed to the ground via a single leg or double leg takedown, and gain the mount. That is all that they are trying to do; they must stick to the script.

    BluFor has to apply their combatives skills toward whatever goal: maintain / regain a standing position, deploy a weapon and deliver verbal commands, deploy a weapon and engage point-specific targets (center of mass shots, or whatever), achieve a dominant position and then disengage, etc.

    Victory conditions are either OpFor gains and maintains the mount for three open hand strikes to the Blue Force combatant's head OR Blue Force successfully achieves their victory conditions. A third party referee calls "Index" or whatever safety word to end the scenario.

    What is good about this kind of structure is that it allows the OpFor to provide specific, skill-oriented challenges to the BluFor, but still apply them at upwards of 80% of full power. Further, BluFor doesn't necessarily know what is coming at them. Maybe this time, the OpFor will be compliant to all verbal commands until contact is made for handcuffing, and then will dive on the BluFor's weapon hand/gun. Maybe this time the OpFor will preferentially stay on their feet and deliver repeated overhand rights, trying to put BluFor's chin into the cheap seats. Maybe this time, OpFor will just posture and yell, but will eventually comply with verbal commands and won't engage. BluFor has no idea. They just have to respond with whatever combatives skills they have been training.

    There are a lot of variables that can be tweaked here. BluFor can be allowed to be pre-emptive with violence, for example. OpFor may have a hidden weapon on their person. OpFor may have a friend that can join the scenario.

    The point is, each side has clearly set boundaries to what they can and cannot do, some of which are clearly known to all participants (no biting, gouging, elbows to the face, or whatever else is deemed appropriate and safe) while others are unknown to the Blue Force combatant. Instead, they just have to roll with it and apply their training in real time, against a resisting opponent who has very clear goals and wants to 'win', even if winning doesn't mean hospitalizing someone.

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  8. #20
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    Chris

    Exactly.

    An important element with this kind of training is the devolution to "sparring" can be avoided with proper oversight. This is important when training for an open, armed, combative versus competitive environment. The two are not the same and the approach should have some key differences as far the goal intended.
    Last edited by Hissho; 28th November 2015 at 19:55.

  9. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hissho View Post
    Steering clear of specific arts, what and or how do people go about telling the difference between what is practical and realistic and what is more "research and development" oriented in what they do?
    I have just one word in the back of my mind: efficiency. Just because to be efficient it means 2 things for me:
    1. you understood the situation you are into
    2. you can't be efficient without using minimum effort with maximum effect

    Martial arts are giving you words (technics) and some syntaxes (situations where technics are applied) but you are the writer after all.
    Last edited by Derzis; 19th February 2016 at 02:04.

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