Likes Likes:  27
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 32

Thread: The Scarcity of Real Combative Training: Miyamoto Musashi and Misty the Cat

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    12
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default The Scarcity of Real Combative Training: Miyamoto Musashi and Misty the Cat

    The Scarcity of Real Combative Training: Miyamoto Musashi and Misty the Cat
    Steven J. Pearlman, Ph.D.
    www.PraxisMartialArts.com

    “To cut and to slash are two different things. Cutting, whatever form of cutting it is, is decisive, with a resolute spirit. Slashing is nothing more than touching the enemy. Even if you slash strongly, and even if the enemy dies instantly, it is slashing. When you cut, your spirit is resolved.”
    Miyamoto Musashi, Book of Five Rings

    If there’s a hole in many modern martial arts’ approach to combative realism, and I assert there is one, it might take the form of Musashi’s point above. Musashi, in his enduring wisdom, illuminates what we could identify as the crux of combative training, and that crux does not necessarily hold any relationship to fighting full contact, training for the “street,” or training in modern vs. traditional ways.

    Continue reading HERE



    Steve Pearlman
    www.praxismartialarts.com
    Author, The Book of Martial Power

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK, Canada
    Posts
    1,526
    Likes (received)
    58

    Default

    Welcome to e-budo. Nice plug for your business/book. What is it you actually train? How do you train?
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    12
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Hi, sir. Thank you for the welcome.

    I had hoped only to raise a genuinely thoughtful point of discussion about the arts. I've been training in the arts for over thirty years; I don't follow a recognized style but only hold the utmost respect for those who do.

    Steve

    P.S. (Did I mention my book in the post? I didn't think I did.)


    Quote Originally Posted by gendzwil View Post
    Welcome to e-budo. Nice plug for your business/book. What is it you actually train? How do you train?



    Steve Pearlman
    www.praxismartialarts.com
    Author, The Book of Martial Power

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    6,225
    Likes (received)
    117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StevePearlman View Post
    ...(Did I mention my book in the post? I didn't think I did.)
    "www.praxismartialarts.com
    Author, The Book of Martial Power"

    Yeah, you did; not in the body of the post, but in your signature block.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    12
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    The article isn't from the book.



    Steve Pearlman
    www.praxismartialarts.com
    Author, The Book of Martial Power

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK, Canada
    Posts
    1,526
    Likes (received)
    58

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StevePearlman View Post
    I had hoped only to raise a genuinely thoughtful point of discussion about the arts.
    Well, the article was pretty vague. That's why I asked for specifics of your training.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    6,225
    Likes (received)
    117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StevePearlman View Post
    The article isn't from the book.
    No one said it was.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,392
    Likes (received)
    83

    Default

    So what do you want to discuss?

    Cats or Musashi?
    Chris Thomas

    "While people are entitled to their illusions, they are not entitled to a limitless enjoyment of them and they are not entitled to impose them upon others."

    "Team Cynicism" MVP 2005-2006
    Currently on "Injured/Reserve" list due to a scathing Sarcasm pile-up.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Hiroshima, Japan.
    Posts
    2,544
    Likes (received)
    145

    Default

    Hello Mr Pearlman,

    Welcome to E-Budo.

    As you have probably gathered, the active members of this forum are serious martial artists with very varied technical backgrounds. I think that together the membership constitutes a serious group, some experts, others less expert, but committed nonetheless, who are not afraid to question and debate the form, content, history, and aims of the arts they practice. Some members can also speak and read Japanese to a high level of fluency. The debates can become quite heated at times, but the moderators and admin are also serious martial artists who are, in addition, committed to ensuring that the discussions are robust, fair and reasonable -- and also respectful of the bona fides of all the participants.

    So, as I stated above, welcome to E-Budo and we look forward to your continued participation. It takes some courage to write a book on Japanese martial culture, but in a way, you also stick your neck out and make statements that are subject to intense scrutiny. So please do not be put off too much by the questions.


    Best wishes,
    P Goldsbury
    Peter Goldsbury,
    Forum Administrator,
    Hiroshima, Japan

  10. Likes CEB liked this post
  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,166
    Likes (received)
    336

    Default

    It begs some questions, the first being what exactly are we talking about?

    If it is a lack in the "modern martial arts approach to combative realism," I would agree. The same holds true for traditional and classical arts practiced in modern times (perhaps even moreso to those arts) - but then again it was true "back then" as well, or Musashi would have not have penned what he did in critiquing the slash vs. cut approach - or other things he wrote such as commercial martial arts, strategy being improperly taught, etc.

    So then it really comes down to what the writer - in this case Steven - is bringing to the table in opening the discussion.

    This is an area of particular interest to me, as everybody here should know just by reading the combatives forums. As a practitioner of modern and modern-traditional arts (BJJ and Judo), as well as certified in several modern combatives systems, and with some direct personal experience, I have similar views on modern practices of martial arts, regardless of their provenance.

    Indeed in most cases the more one practices "martial arts" the further one moves away from combative realism. It has over the years become increasingly obvious to me that many of those most attached to ideas of combative realism in martial arts are full of unproven theories, idealized technique, and are much to devoted to "what teacher says..." than I am comfortable with.

    I don't subscribe to those ideas, which is I think why I have had trouble fully accepting, and thus being accepted within, the classical form of pedagogy where "teacher" is the model of all that is the tradition, and all that is the tradition's approach to combat.

    That being said I am deeply convinced that a confluence of classical teachings such as "resolute spirit," and true combative realism would be a more effective approach to teaching mindset and psychological and physical organization in modern combatives. There is a great lack of this in the teaching current in modern armed professions, to be sure.

    Unfortunately, I find myself in the same boat with Neil: articles from martial artists - even lauded teachers - on such things tend to be very vague, full of notional concepts that have obviously not been subjected to repeated testing, especially not tested in harm's way on a regular basis. Some of it is certainly a translation issue, but some of it is just people not knowing what they don't know and passing that on to their students.

    So yeah, I too would like to hear what the background of our poster is, and hear more about what he thinks, and what he means, on the subject here.
    Kit Leblanc

    In Harm's Way

  12. Likes CEB, Cady Goldfield, cxt, mkrueger liked this post
  13. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK, Canada
    Posts
    1,526
    Likes (received)
    58

    Default

    I think he didn't get the reaction he was hoping for and has left us.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,862
    Likes (received)
    90

    Default

    Too bad. The OP would probably enjoy conversing the subject (whatever it is ) with Hyakutake Sensei.
    Ed Boyd

  15. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,166
    Likes (received)
    336

    Default

    Since this post directly addresses combatives, I wonder if we might put it in the Personal Protection forum?

    I think it does present an interesting question:

    What do we mean when we think "combative realism?"

    Self defense? Military combat? "Street fighting?"

    When we speak of "resolute spirit," what comes to mind?

    Can we make room for the idea that often times, combative realism has nothing to do with physical techniques?
    Kit Leblanc

    In Harm's Way

  16. Likes cxt, pgsmith, CEB liked this post
  17. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,392
    Likes (received)
    83

    Default

    Good questions.

    I consider the teachings generally within most of the koryu to be as real as it gets. Depending on how one defines "real" of course.

    That being said I'm not likely to be facing someone in a sword vs spear dual anytime soon. So for that reason I think when most people use the world "realism" they mean "whatever situation I'm most likely to face."

    Yes, IMO I would say that combative realism sometimes has nothing to do with physical technique. As the question was once poised "who would you rather fight a 200 lbs guy that has been paid to beat you up or a 100 lbs. women that is 100% convinced that killing you is the only way to save her child?"

    Technique is critically important, but commitment plays a crucial role as well.

    As does ability to take a beating and still keep fighting---which I suppose is another way of saying "commitment."
    Chris Thomas

    "While people are entitled to their illusions, they are not entitled to a limitless enjoyment of them and they are not entitled to impose them upon others."

    "Team Cynicism" MVP 2005-2006
    Currently on "Injured/Reserve" list due to a scathing Sarcasm pile-up.

  18. Likes mkrueger, pgsmith liked this post
  19. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,166
    Likes (received)
    336

    Default

    Thanks for chiming in, Chris - in my limited experience with koryu, I would agree that done correctly, it can be very "real," in fact it is very similar in design to modern force on force and scenario based training.

    Unfortunately without a bridging mechanism for modern contexts and environments, it isn't very real at all.

    How do you personally define it to be "as real as it gets?"
    Kit Leblanc

    In Harm's Way

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Miyamoto Musashi, primer
    By bu-kusa in forum Koryu: History and Tradition
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 8th May 2009, 18:10
  2. Miyamoto Musashi
    By Alastourblaque in forum Sword Arts
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 23rd May 2006, 23:27
  3. Miyamoto Musashi's bokken
    By J. A. Crippen in forum Clothing and Supplies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 4th January 2005, 01:03
  4. miyamoto musashi sword
    By hiroyuki in forum Sword Arts
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 14th September 2004, 21:24
  5. New book on Miyamoto Musashi
    By nizamuddin in forum Sword Arts
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12th April 2004, 19:38

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •