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Thread: Komei Sekiguchi

  1. #16
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    Default Sekiguchi Sensei's jujutsu

    Aloha again Todd,

    Send me a mailing address and I will send you an order form for the video. I would really appreciate seeing the photos that you have of Lim Sensei and the 1998 Friendship Tournament. Can you e-mail them to rwm@maui.net ? Could you also check the web site address for GM Lim. I am not able to connect.

    Yes, Sekiguchi Sensei does teach use of the saya and tsuka to stop an opponent’s draw, control the opponent and to take the opponent down. He does not refer to them as ”aiki jutsu” but simply as “jujutsu”. The techniques are executed from the standing, seiza and tatehiza starting position. These techniques are not a part of the Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu curriculum. He teaches them to help the students handle their sword and body with more confidence, grace and skill as well as helping them becoming comfortable with body contact while wearing a sword. This training is also beneficial to change the pace and focus during class so that the students can return to the traditional forms training refreshed.

    Waiting to hear from you Todd,

    Robert W. Montgomery

  2. #17
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    I want to thank everyone who has responded to Todd's thread. I am also a student of GM Lim's and a friend of Todd's who is getting more into the Guhapdo. This has been a great thread.

    Montgomery Sensei, are the video tapes still available?

    Also, how is the video series by Masayuki Shimabukuro?
    http://www.budovideos.com/shop/custo...cat=366&page=2

    It looks like it would be a great asset. Is this a worthwhile series to purchase?

    Thanks
    Chris LaCava
    Jung Ki Kwan of Connecticut
    "At birth man is soft and supple,
    in death he is hard and rigid..." Lao Tzu

  3. #18
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    You did note that that thread was 3 years old right? Good chance you won't get a reply. Thanks for the bump though. Lots of good info on here about Sekiguchi Komei-sensei. I was unaware of Sekiguchi Komei-sensei's ties to the Yamanouchi-ha. Would Irey-sensei care to comment?

    To which I'd add that as far as I know Sekiguchi Komei-sensei and the Komei Jyuku is completely outside the Zen Nippon Iaido Renmei, although that may not have always been the case. And the ZNIR was, again to my knowledge, never led by an "Ogasawara-sensei". The President of the ZNIR is a position traditionally held by the soke of MJER, which in this case would be the MJER led by Ikeda-soke.
    Charles Mahan

    Iaido - Breaking down bad habits,
    and building new ones.

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    Originally posted by Charles Mahan
    You did note that that thread was 3 years old right?
    Yes I did, but I figured nothing ventured, nothing gained.

    I would love to have my questions answered by anyone who has some experience with Sekiguchi Komei sensei or his style of swordsmanship.


    Thanks again.
    Chris LaCava
    Jung Ki Kwan of Connecticut
    "At birth man is soft and supple,
    in death he is hard and rigid..." Lao Tzu

  5. #20
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    Mr. Montgomery:

    Thanks for the information. It is always interesting to get more information about different lineages within MJER. (When I lived in Japan many years ago, I trained with Masaoka Kazumi (Katsukane) Sensei in Kanazawa for about a year prior to his death.)

    I have a question: it is my understanding that Oe Masamichi was uncommonly large and strong for a Japanese of his generaton, yet he apparently preferred swords that were comparitively light and short. Is the Komei Juku's emphasis on relatively long and heavy swords an innovation of Sekiguchi Sensei or does it have another origin?

    Thanks in advance.
    Earl Hartman

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    Default USA Dojo

    Hello Everyone,

    There is a USA dojo that teaches the Eishin Ryu and is an official dojo to teach in America. The dojo is Katsujin Ryu Budokai under Walt Bushey Sensei in Lubbock, Texas. Bushey Sensei usually sponsers a seminar wich Sekiguchi-sensei at least once a year. You can check out his web-site at www.katsujin.org.

    Hope this helps.

    Dale Joseph
    Lubbock Kobudo Dojo
    Dale Joseph
    Jinenkan Butoku Dojo

    With "Justice and Unity" as our motto, the Jinenkan will continue to emphasize the fundamentals, faithful to the Densho, in pursuit of natural movement which is as unforced as the flow of clouds and water"... - Manaka Unsui Sensei

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    And another dojo in Miami http://www.miami-komei-jyuku.org/
    Charles Mahan

    Iaido - Breaking down bad habits,
    and building new ones.

  8. #23
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    Default Re: USA Dojo

    Originally posted by kakuma
    Hello Everyone,

    There is a USA dojo that teaches the Eishin Ryu and is an official dojo to teach in America. The dojo is Katsujin Ryu Budokai under Walt Bushey Sensei in Lubbock, Texas. Bushey Sensei usually sponsers a seminar wich Sekiguchi-sensei at least once a year. You can check out his web-site at www.katsujin.org.

    Hope this helps.

    Dale Joseph
    Lubbock Kobudo Dojo
    This is the dojo where I train. Sekiguchi sensei will be visiting us in October of this year for a week of training. I also think we will be making a few day trips as well, one to San Antonio for sure. Sekiguchi sensei says he wants to see the Alamo
    If you understand, things are just as they are...
    If you do not understand, things are just as they are.
    -Zen proverb

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    Default Width of blade

    Very interesting blade geometry. Can anyone here tell me the width of the blade at the base and at the yokote? Most blades are about 3cm at base, but I suspect that the blade used by Sekiguchi sensei is much wider? I would like to make a bokken to represent this style and stay as accurate as possible. Thank you in advance.
    G. Dinh

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert W. Montgomery View Post
    Aloha Todd,

    I have been a student of Sekiguchi Sensei for over 13 years. Seven of the 13 years were training with him almost daily in Tokyo. The past 6 years I have lived and continued my training under him on Maui. He comes to Maui at least once per year . ( on occasion he has come more then one time in a year). I represent him (as best I can) and his Komei Juku in the US, communicating and following up with his English speaking contacts and students world wide. In addition I have over 35 years experience in Japanese martial arts (Jujutsu and Judo) and have collected and studied the Japanese sword as an art object for over 25 years.

    I am pleased that you have received some very good information from Paul Steadman, Hans-Georg Matuttis and Guy H. Power. I would like to contribute a little additional information as well as some clarity to what has been provided.

    Information from Paul Steadman:
    Onoue Sensei passed away in 1996. I had the good fortune to visit him many times with Sekiguchi Sensei while I was training in Japan. He was a very impressive figure despite his health and age. He spoke continuously about the importance of a bushi attitude, spirit and iai training. Two of the Maui students and I visited his wife in 1997 while we were there training with Sekiguchi sensei. It was an honor for us to make an incense offering at his home shrine. His reading of the kanji for his given name is Masamitsu. As you may know the kanji for names my be read several different ways. An example of this is Sekiguchi Sensei’s given name, Takaaki. The same kanji can be read Komei which he uses since he was made the 21st Grandmaster. Historically it is not an uncommon practice for a person to change his name after a major event in his life.

    Sekiguchi Sensei encourages his student to use shinken 2 shaku 8 sun (85 cm) in length. These usually weigh about 1.7 to 2 kilo depending on their width and thickness. Most of these sword are newly made to the specifications of Sekiguchi Sensei and the student. The sword Sekiguchi Sensei is currently using is 90.8 cm with a 2 mm sori (curve). I do not know how much this sword weighs but I would guess about 2.2 or 2.3 kilo. I use two different swords in my daily training. One is 3 shaku (91 cm) and is traditional width (41 mm tapering to 33 mm) to length ration, weighing 2.5 kilo. The second is 2 shaku 8 sun, wide, (44 mm tapering to 40 mm) weighing 2 kilo. Both swords were specified for me by Sekiguchi Sensei with the purpose of giving me a life time challenge. Because the Komei Juku people use larger swords should not take away from people who use a smaller and lighter sword. I have witnessed some very impressive sword work done with the lighter swords. Even though physics does enter in to it, I admire their speed and skill.
    A good swordsman is a good swordsman regardless of size, weight or type of sword (including shinai or boken)

    Paul identified the third set of the Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu as “Joden”. The makimono given to Sekiguchi Sensei by Kono Kanemitsu Sensei calls it “Okuden”. We also practice in addition to “Hayanuki”, “Toho”, “Bangai and Toru Bangai” wazas. The katas we practice are “Tsumiai” and “Tachiai” which may be just different names for the same katas Paul mentioned.

    The current head of the Nihon Kobudokai (a division of the Nippon Budokan) is Hanawa Rokutaro. While he is advanced in years he is still very active. Sekiguchi Sensei was appointed to the Board of Directors for the Nippon Budokan last year. The previous year he was given special recognition for his work to preserve Kobudo martial arts by the Budokan.

    While I was training in Japan I traveled to Korea several times with Sekiguchi Sensei. Because we were restricted from bringing our swords into Korea we used the swords provided by our host. As I remember these swords were up to about 2 shaku 8 sun. I do not remember any larger ones used by our host or guests or students. Also while I was in Japan the same Korean group visited us for training with Sekiguchi Sensei. I was using my 3 shaku sword at the time and the Korean students were eager to take a turn with this sword. I know Sekiguchi Sensei still travels to Korea for training at least once per year. He sends me newspaper and magazine articles about these visits. I have difficulties with the Korean names as translated from the Japanese kanji they use but there were two senseis with their groups that I was most impressed with, I believe the younger sensei’s name is Lee, Young Gu. I am still looking for the older sensei name in my files. Sekiguchi Sensei thinks highly of the Korean Bujin and is impressed with their dedication and strength of character. I am therefor embarrassed that I can not be more specific about the names of those I have met and trained with. I feel I should know Lee,Hyun Soo and regret I can find his name in my files. I envy your opportunity to train with the Japanese and Koreans. I am sure you will enjoy meeting and working with Sekiguchi Sensei. He is truly a great teacher.

    Information from Hans-Georg:

    Early this year Sekiguchi Sensei sent me a picture of the Shinagawa dojo group that included Hans-Geog. Looking good Hans san!

    Over the years I have developed some specific ideas about how to use these large swords effectively while remaining healthy ( forearm, shoulder and wrist). Danny Mayman Sensei, Ki Do Kai, South Australia ( a student of Sekiguchi Sensei) started using a 90 cm, 2 kilo sword a little over a year ago. This sword was made for him in Australia. I offered to share some of these ideas with him but I was not satisfied with the presentation I prepared. Danny sensei is still waiting. He is probably “finding his own way” by now. A short summary of my experience is that you must strongly utilize your hips and legs with out bending at the waist (fudemental form for all good sword work). More significant is that you must minimize the use of the shoulders, keeping them down, relaxed and do not let them roll forward. Even more so you must engage the energy and muscles over and under the scapulas. The back muscle groups can also then be engage which gives you more energy and power with less strain on the shoulders and forearms. This is because you are utilizing a combined larger group of muscles (as the combination of your legs and hips). If you follow the energy flow from your hara out to your kisaki you will see that it passes through the back and scapula muscle groups and therefor they need to (must) contribute to the flow of energy to move and stop the sword. Typically we do not develop these scapula muscles in our daily routines. Focusing on the scapula muscles is probably just as important regardless of sword weight or size but neglecting them has a far greater consequence when using the big swords.

    I am not aware of any Komei Juku “Dan-Degrees” signed by Ogasawara Sensei and I am also unaware of any relationship between ZNIR and the Komei Juku. I think this is confirmed by later information from Hans-Georg.

    There are many people who are better students of iai linage then me but for what is worth I have a couple of Japanese language documents that place Sekiguchi Sensei in the MJER linage. His linage is of the Yamanouchi ha identified by Oe Masamichi Sensei’s student Yamanouchi Toyotake (not read Toyoken) . While the MJER linage did split twice in history prior to WWII the picking up of the linage after that war is difficult. This is due to war casualties, the restrictions of the occupational forces and the ambitious but controversial efforts to reestablish Koryu Budo. As I have previously stated kanji characters, particularly names, can be read more then one way. I read Kono Sense’s given name as Kanemitsu. (I believe that Kono Hyakuren is a deferent person in the Hogiyama ha after Oe Sensei.) Onoue Sensei’s given name is read Masamitsu.

    Yamanouchi Toyotake Sensei was the son of Yamanouchi Yodo, the Edo jidai lord of Toso on the island of Shikoku. Yamanouchi Yodo is a prominent figure in Romulus Hillsborough’s historical novel “Ryoma - Life of a Renaissance Samurai”. Toyotake Sensei’s son (Toyomi) lives in Tokyo and his grandson (Taki) lives in Australia. Neither practice iai. Mayman Sensei and I have tried to piece together some information about the Yamanouchi ha and he has met with Taki san. Sekiguchi Sensei has met with Toyomi san as recently as this year. A Yamanouchi group of iai Bujin from Tosa meet every four years in Kyoto for a taikai.

    While I trained in Japan Kono Sense’s picture was hanging on the Honbu Shinagawa dojo wall. Onoue Sensei was still living at the time. I know it is difficult to ask questions while in the dojo so I would like to suggest to Hans-Georg that he invite Sekiguchi Sensei for a cup of coffee at the Ozaki station before keiko. In this environment it will be much easier to ask these kinds of questions. I think Sekiguchi Sensei will be please that Hans-Georg is interested. In the mean time I will try to find more about the thinking behind still having Kono Sensei’s picture displayed. It may be simply that Sekiguchi Sensei’s makimono are signed by Kono Sensei. ( by the way, Sekiguchi Sensei studied iaijutsu at Kono Sensei’s Meibukan dojo. I will have to go back to the files to see were this was documented.)

    Because of the large number of member and the limited time to perform the groups of the Budokan rotate giving performances at the February Kobudotaikei. On “off years” many group perform the necessary background support needed to put on a performance of this size. I have participated in both roles with Sekiguchi and I know he would not pass up any opportunity to perform either role just to travel.

    I believe that Sekiguchi Sensei does not discuss the ins and outs of the legitimacy of linage, soke and groups because he feels it is not the way real Bujin should conduct them self. He often reminded us to “never pass up the opportunity to me some new and to make an honest effort to understand that person”. He also admonished us, each time we saw demonstrations of other styles and techniques, “ not criticize what we saw but to try to understand what was being done or communicated”. His recognition and role in the Budokan, his demonstrated efforts to spread the value of iaijutsu training world wide and his demonstrated skill as a leader and teacher is good enough for me. I am honored, pleased and proud to be one of his students. My interest in linage is only to support my study of Japanese history and culture.

    Information from Guy H. Power:

    On one of Sekiguchi Sensei’s trips to Hawaii in 1995 I made arrangements for Wayne Muromoto to interview him. This resulted in the article in the #5 edition of “Furyu - Budo Journal”. Sekiguchi sensei invited me to participate in the demonstration covered by the pictures in that article. While I had practiced extensively in Japan only six months perviously with all the member of this visiting group I declined. I felt the people of Hawaii would want to see a Japanese troupe perform without the distraction of a gaijin. In retrospect I wish I had not declined because Sekiguchi Sensei’s message to the world about the value of iai training for all would have been better served. I hope I have since made up for this poor judgment.

    I have a high regard for Wayne and his effort to provide a quality budo magazine. He publishes this magazine all by himself so some times you must wait for the new issues. The quality of the publication is worth the wait when this happens so be patient.

    Guy Power did a better job of remembering me from Nakamura’ Sensei’s birthday party then I did of him. This is a credit to Guy san’s budo training for observation and awareness It is also a discredit to my keeping my wits about me when in the environment of so many iai/batto celebrities. I have since looked at Guy’s web site and his training under a great Bushi is very apparent. I hope to renew a relationship with him.

    I and a member of Maui Komei Juku are in the process of putting a web site together for the benefit of readers of the English language who are interested in Sekiguchi Komei Sensei, his travels and his idea. There should be a lot of picture and I hope Sekiguchi Sensei’s students and friends from around the world will contribute to it’s content. Give us another month or two. Sekiguchi sensei has two video available from Japan. One covers Shoden the Chuden. The Shoden video can be ordered from BAB, publishers of Hiden Budo Magazine. I believe the Chuden video can be purchased directly from Sekiguchi Sensei.

    Todd san, have a great trip to Japan and a rewarding training experience with Sekiguchi Sensei. Time is precious, use it well

    Your in Budo

    Robert W. Montgomery
    Komei Juku Beikoku Honbu
    Makawao, county of Maui, state of Hawaii
    Hello,
    Thank you for this post. Would a blade width of 53 mm tapering to 33 mm be in line with this style of swordsmanship? Yoroshiku oneigaishimasu.
    G. Dinh
    Last edited by riverdinh; 26th April 2016 at 04:44. Reason: Forgot to sign

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by riverdinh View Post
    Hello,
    Thank you for this post. Would a blade width of 53 mm tapering to 33 mm be in line with this style of swordsmanship? Yoroshiku oneigaishimasu.
    G. Dinh
    Greetings and welcome to e-budo.

    I think you would probably be better off addressing your questions directly to a contact at a Komei juku dojo (you'll have to look them up on-line) as this thread is 15 years old. I looked on his profile, and Robert Montgomery hasn't signed in to e-budo since 2007, so I don't think he will respond.

    Good luck!
    Paul Smith
    "Always keep the sharp side and the pointy end between you and your opponent"

  12. #27
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    I used to meet Sekiguchi Sensei at least three times a year at Nihon Kobudo Kyokai. I had some very nice informative chats with him. Probably the best being his take on sitting in seiza to drink tea. There was quite a lot of chat within the Kyokai when Sekiguchi Sensei started to use larger blades. I should make it clear that they had not used to. But his his prerogative an intellectual copyright as head of his line. I have never had a problem with it knowing that many years ago blades were not some of the peasticks some use today. Old blades have niku (meat on the blade). He wished to add more realism to his art. My own ryu uses extra long larger/heavier weapons with one of purposes being to build up the user to be able to use anything in a given situation.

    Having done MJER for some time I think it would advantageous to use a heavier weapon providing it was not too long. This would interfere with the waza.
    Last edited by hyaku; 2nd May 2016 at 22:22.
    Hyakutake Colin

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    Well, a most common mistake about Komei Jyűku iaijutsu(MJER - Yamauchi-ha Tôkyô) is thinking that Sekiguchi sensei started the usingof long, heavy and wide blades.
    First we must think that MJER founder, Hayashizaki Jinsuke Minamoto noShigenobu sword was 3 shaku 3 sun. Also the 2nd Tamaiya Heibei Shigemasa andthe 3rd headschool, Muraku Nyűdô Kinrosai used both swort and long swords fordiferent situations.
    If we're talking about MJER - Tosa iaijutsu, then we must think that in the XIXcentury many bushi take long and wide swords. We can saw examples of that onpictures of Bakumatsu jidai Tosa bushi, like for example, Kondo Chôjiro, Okada Izo or Takasugi Shinsaku (who was a Chôshű samurai, but served for a while to Yamauchi Toyoshige Yôdô in Tosa). About our 18th representative, Yamauchi Toyotake Hôken (Yôdô's grandson) liked both short and big swords, like his grandfather, who, for example ordered forge one 3 shaku 2 sun katana to kaji Tomotaka Nankaitarô, which is conserved in Yamauchi Treasure Museum in Kôchi. Our 19th representative Kono Kanemitsu also liked big and short katana. He used short katana for battôjutsu and long for iaijutsu. Our 20th representative Onoe Masamitsu also liked both, he used short for practice of Tôhô Gohon kata and big for koryű iaijutsu. Our present 21st representative, Sekiguchi Komei used both in his youth, but since about 30 years, he pointed only in the big sword. So, the history about Sekiguchi sensei was who began the use of long swords in MJER practice is a long time misunderstanding.
    Here you can see our 19th Kono Kanemitsu and our 20th Onoe Masamitsu both with a 3 shaku katana.



    Sekiguchi Kenryű - MJER iaijutsu (Komei Jyűku) Spain hombu.
    Ryôen Ryűko - Ryôen ryű naginatajutsu Spain hombu.

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