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Thread: Keshi Ryu Kata - Help with Translation

  1. #1
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    Question

    I need some help here. I am attempting to assist a friend of mine with the translation and transcription(into kanji/kana) of the five kata for Keshi Ryu Iaido.

    I've done some research on my own (in books and web) and I am a bit daunted by the task.

    The five kata are:
    Maegoshi (Asayama Ichiden Ryu)
    Musogaeshi (Shindo Munen Ryu )
    Migi No Teki (Kyoshin Meichi Ryu )
    Mawarigake (Tamiya Ryu )
    Shihou (Tatsumi Ryu )

    I have included the originating ryu if that's any help.

    Some of them (like shihou) I know from other context, but I'm guessing at most. For example, gaeshi? Also, I know goshi can refer the hip (koshi), but I dare say that's not the proper usage here.

    Also, I realize that not all Japanese "words" have corresponding kanji, and are simply written in kana. However, I have an insignifant knowledge base to know what and where.

    FYI: I have the NTC and Nelson's Kanji dictionaries, so if you have references for either/or, that would be great!

    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!
    --
    Terrence Beard
    Nana Korobi Ya Oki

  2. #2
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    Thumbs up

    The only one that I am unsure of is Mawarigake, but I think it has something to do with turning (in the kata, to the left).
    The 'goshi' in Mae goshi is hip, Mae goshi is "hips to the front".
    Muso Gaeshi= turn without thought
    Migi no Teki=enemy to the right
    Mawarigake=?
    Shiho= four directions

    BTW, where did you or your friend learn Keishi Ryu?
    Regards,
    Brian Dunham
    MSR SanShinKai

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up

    Brain:

    thanks for the quick reply!

    The only one that I am unsure of is Mawarigake, but I think it has something to do with turning (in the kata, to the left).
    I tend to concurr. I mawaru means to turn or revolve. The only reference I could find for gake (indirectly) which made sense means something half done (like partial completed). So, the kata could mean "partial rotation", but that's a guess. Also, while searching for other information, I did see that one named <i>mawarinuki</i>. Does this help you any?!?

    BTW, where did you or your friend learn Keishi Ryu?
    My friend is studying iaido and kali at a school in Rochester, NY. I unfortunately have not have the time or resources to pursue iai in any form, though I wish I could. I'm a karateka, and for the moment this is enough.

    Muso Gaeshi= turn without thought
    Do you know if that's literal or figurative translation? I am also attempting to match Kanji to the kata. Nevertheless, this will go a long way toward helping me regardless.

    The rest confirmed what I have been able to uncover. Always nice to have a confirming point of view!

    Thanks again for all the help!
    --
    Terrence Beard
    Nana Korobi Ya Oki

  4. #4
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    Default Mawashigake

    "Gaeshi" means reversal (returning to ...). In jujutsu/aikido-type arts there is a waza called "kotegaeshi" -- it involves twisting the opponents hand in an opposing direction, causing the wrist to lock. Practitioners of these arts can explain it better than I.

    Mawarigake might mean "turning." I'd have to see the kanji -- and it's just a guess now ... but "gake" might be the softening of "kake," to attach.

    So, it is no stretch of the imagination to guess that "mawashigake" means simply to turn, or "turning to..."

    Again -- just guesses. My vocabulary continues to wither away from non-use, I don't have my dictionaries at this location ... and possibly hundreds of other reasons if I'm wrong

    Regards,
    Guy
    Guy H. Power
    Kenshinkan Dojo

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    Guy Power wrote:

    Mawarigake might mean "turning." I'd have to see the kanji -- and it's just a guess now ... but "gake" might be the softening of "kake," to attach.
    "Attach" is a rather literal translation for kake/gake. In this context, a better rendering is "to initiate an attack." Thus, mawarigake might denote a twisting attack.

    Good luck,
    William Bodiford
    Professor
    Dept. of Asian Languages & Cultures
    UCLA

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    Dr. Bodiford,

    Thank you very much for the translation. Yes sir, I do know that literal translations are not a good thing. It's always nice to have a knowledgeable scholar on board to keep us up to snuff.

    Many thanks for your past kindnesses.

    --Guy
    Guy H. Power
    Kenshinkan Dojo

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